Does anyone know why And you thought there is never a girl online? Rated TV-MA.



  • I watched this show and to me it seemed like it could've been rated TV-14. Does anyone know why it's rated TV-MA?



  • Probably the fanservice.



  • But even so, I've seen anime rated TV-14 that had way more fanservice than this show.



  • I

    Wonder

    Why



  • Fair enough. However, I had always thought that TV-MA meant graphic violence, language, and nudity. I guess a lot fanservice can be put under the same rating.



  • @colehirst15:

    Fair enough. However, I had always thought that TV-MA meant graphic violence, language, and nudity. I guess a lot fanservice can be put under the same rating.

    TV ratings aren't governed by an outside body like the MPAA or ESRB. It's likely just Funimation covering their backsides in case some kids' parents make a big deal out of it.



  • That's actually not true. All television shows receive a single rating from some entity called the TV Parental Guidelines. The ratings are TV-Y, TV-Y7, TV-G, TV-PG, TV-14, TV-MA, and X, as well as the abbreviations of D, L, S, V, and FV. This board subsequently gave the series a rating before it started "airing" in the States.



  • @Gemnist:

    This board subsequently gave the series a rating before it started "airing" in the States.

    If it were to be aired on TV though. Overlord had to get its rating changed from 14 to MA because of a particular episode. I am pretty sure TV Parental Guidelines don't extend their power to the internet and Funimation just kind of guesses what their shows will be (with pretty okay accuracy).



  • For anime in particular, the rating changes from episode to episode. For example, Death Note was almost entirely TV-14 its whole run, but because the penultimate episode had seizure shots and the series finale had graphic violence, both were rated TV-MA. Also, because of their intense violence and depiction of blood, Episodes 14, 19, and 26 of FMAB were rated TV-MA also, and the season one finale of Code Geass also got the rating because of its use of nudity. Ultimately, the real problem is that, though these episodes are given individual ratings, they never show up on streaming and are only ever seen in broadcasts.



  • @Gemnist:

    That's actually not true. All television shows receive a single rating from some entity called the TV Parental Guidelines. The ratings are TV-Y, TV-Y7, TV-G, TV-PG, TV-14, TV-MA, and X, as well as the abbreviations of D, L, S, V, and FV. This board subsequently gave the series a rating before it started "airing" in the States.

    TVPG doesn't have any input with digital series, and this applies to other streaming services like Netflix. They only mark shows that broadcast on television Funimation likely adds the TV ratings for simple parity's sake, and they largely have to guess since Japan doesn't have a TV rating system



  • Honestly I have no idea why they rated it Mature…

    There's really no reason. There's a lot more questionable content out there more over the top than that and not rated Mature... Netoge is pretty tame compared to most...

    TV14 would be more appropriate. Netoge is pretty tame.



  • @Gemnist:

    That's actually not true. All television shows receive a single rating from some entity called the TV Parental Guidelines.

    That is not true, ratings for TV are self govern and EyeOfPain give the right information.



  • Technically, you both are right. This is what I found on Wikipedia:

    "The TV Parental Guidelines are a television content rating system in the United States that was first proposed on December 19, 1996, by the United States Congress, the television industry and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), and went into effect by January 1, 1997, on most major broadcast and cable networks in response to public concerns about increasingly explicit sexual content, graphic violence and strong profanity in television programs. It was established as a voluntary-participation system, with ratings to be determined by the individually participating broadcast and cable networks.

    The ratings are generally applied to most television series, television films and edited broadcast or basic cable versions of theatrically-released films; premium channels also assign ratings from the TV Parental Guidelines on broadcasts of some films that have been released theatrically or on home video, either if the Motion Picture Association of America did not assign a rating for the film or if the channel airs the unrated version of the film.

    It was specifically designed to be used with the V-chip, which was mandated to be built into all television sets manufactured since 2000, but the guidelines themselves have no legal force, and are not used on sports or news programs or during commercial advertisements. Many online television services, such as Hulu, Amazon Video and Netflix also use the Guidelines system, along with digital video vendors such as the iTunes Store and Google Play."

    Source: (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TV_Parental_Guidelines)



  • @classyspartan:

    I

    Wonder

    Why?

    Pardon for my "late entry" into this thread, nevertheless the pictures you cited are not MA. There is no nudity; no nipples or genitilia shown. For instance, I could cite an army of Hollywood movies that would get PG-13 for such, lest I cite…



  • @nubguy:

    It was established as a voluntary-participation system, with ratings to be determined by the individually participating broadcast and cable networks.

    And yet the ESRB is practically mandated.

    Oh sorry I mean its voluntary but since you generally want publicity you need it.

    In my opinion the only ratings should be Family appropriate, and MA. I mean if we let 8 year olds play M rated games (GTA) anyway or watch R movies like Deadpool (which was funny that adults actually let them by the way) clearly we don't care. It is YOUR DUTY as a parent to teach your kids some things you know?

    I mean c'mon the esrb has only rated 27 total games to be rated AO. (source)



  • @thegrandalliance:

    Pardon for my "late entry" into this thread, nevertheless the pictures you cited are not MA. There is no nudity; no nipples or genitilia shown. For instance, I could cite an army of Hollywood movies that would get PG-13 for such, lest I cite…

    Fair point. I'll at least argue that the thought process for Funi's listed MA rating had more to do with sexual themes in general than due to any profanity, but it's fairly light in terms of explicit sexual fanservice content. Though you do make a fair point, I just never thought that it really mattered whether the show had a TV-14 or a TV-MA rating unless on the off-chance it ended up being aired on television at a later date.

    Regardless I honest to god didn't even know that shows on Funimation's site had listen TV ratings until this thread brought that up. They're probably more placeholders or general surface warnings more than anything.

    @darthrutsula:

    I mean c'mon the esrb has only rated 27 total games to be rated AO.

    One of which is an anime!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05fbwE5RMSs



  • @darthrutsula:

    And yet the ESRB is practically mandated.

    Oh sorry I mean its voluntary but since you generally want publicity you need it.

    The thing with the ESRB, besides being an independent industry organization, and more just a loose set of guidelines, is that the majority of major retailers will not carry untreated or AO games. Most of those retailers likely wouldn't carry video content without ratings, again it's self-regulated, and only becomes an issue if someone feels the displayed rating is not sufficiently high enough given the content.



  • @EyeOfPain:

    The thing with the ESRB, besides being an independent industry organization, and more just a loose set of guidelines,

    …...........

    https://youtu.be/6GMkuPiIZ2k



  • @EyeOfPain:

    The thing with the ESRB, besides being an independent industry organization, and more just a loose set of guidelines, is that the majority of major retailers will not carry untreated or AO games. Most of those retailers likely wouldn't carry video content without ratings, again it's self-regulated, and only becomes an issue if someone feels the displayed rating is not sufficiently high enough given the content.

    But its not like those stores will ID the children that buy games that are rated below M. Steam doesn't ask my age when I look to buy a T rated game, but they constantly do for the M rated ones. I'm saying that the T and E ratings are pointless. What's worse, in my opinion, is that in video games violence is A-Okay, but sex isn't. I don't think I've heard of someone getting PTSD from sex (don't count rape). I understand censorship can be a necessary thing sometimes, but I think that we just like to censor things. I remember looking at the rating on some of my games and seriously question where they get some of their reasons sometimes because I'll look in the game and find nothing relating to it (primarily blood).

    I get retailers, like Walmart, wanting to have those ratings because you don't really want kids seeing tits. But we sell friggin guns in my store. Hell down south kids also have BB guns. I get that the key to safety is exposure but damn sex-ed your damn kid and not just let them lose on the internet.

    What kid asks parents for permission to go online anyway?

    ! as you can tell i don't like rating systems



  • @darthrutsula:

    But its not like those stores will ID the children that buy games that are rated below M. Steam doesn't ask my age when I look to buy a T rated game, but they constantly do for the M rated ones. I'm saying that the T and E ratings are pointless. What's worse, in my opinion, is that in video games violence is A-Okay, but sex isn't. I don't think I've heard of someone getting PTSD from sex (don't count rape). I understand censorship can be a necessary thing sometimes, but I think that we just like to censor things. I remember looking at the rating on some of my games and seriously question where they get some of their reasons sometimes because I'll look in the game and find nothing relating to it (primarily blood).

    I get retailers, like Walmart, wanting to have those ratings because you don't really want kids seeing tits. But we sell friggin guns in my store. Hell down south kids also have BB guns. I get that the key to safety is exposure but damn sex-ed your damn kid and not just let them lose on the internet.

    What kid asks parents for permission to go online anyway?

    ! as you can tell i don't like rating systems

    It seems rather pointless to be upset at ratings systems, unless a caretaker is using them as the basis to deny you access to content. If that is the case, the systems are actually being used for what they were designed for.

    Even if stores don't enforce those age ratings, those and the content descriptors can be used by parents or guardians to determine what's appropriate for their children. Some people may be fine exposing their younger kids to violence under a T rating, but are more adamant about keeping them from seeing anything sexual.



  • @darthrutsula:

    I mean c'mon the esrb has only rated 27 total games to be rated AO. (source)

    Well there is a reason there are so few AO rated games. Nintendo, Microsoft and Sony won't allow publishers to publish AO games for their system, and major retailers will not sell AO games. So games manufacturers will do everything they can to avoid a dreaded AO rating. Rockstar actually re-edited 'Manhunter 2' down from AO to get an M rating so they could sell it. SImilarly one of the later Leisure Suit Larry games and the Playboy Mansion game were both re-edited to get M ratings.

    @darthrutsula:

    It is YOUR DUTY as a parent to teach your kids some things you know?

    This is quite true. Which is why parents are allowed to let their kids play M games or go to R movies with their parents if they wish. It is up to the parent to decide what is appropriate for their child, and how to handle their exposure to said media.


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