Thunderbolt Fantasy - No Strings Attached!



  • Holy cheesecake. Gen Urobuchi could have broken into my apartment and peed on my rug and I'd still think "y'know, he's a pretty cool dude." I know he as some clout in the anime industry (Madoka figurine sales pretty much secured that), and though subsequent hits like Psycho Pass and Fate Zero have set him to stardom, it's still pretty crazy to imagine that Taiwanese puppetry could be delivered to an audience of Japanese mecha-nerds and idol lovers (like the majority of male otaku - Boochi's primary demographic).

    Who could've through wuxia puppets could look so good, let alone promise to be financially viable. Urobuchi is an auteur, to be true.

    Do you think this series will have cross-demographic appeal, winning over Fushoji crowds with its lovely artistry, elaborate cosplay-friendly costumes and bishies-in-tense-character-dynamics melodrama? I somehow suspect that stuff like Fate/Zero and Madoka (Marketed towards male otaku as tactically-oriented power fantasies and magical-girl-for-your-delecation, respectively) still got as far as they did because of carefully cultivated advertising that won over female demographics. How many Fate/Zero ads showed male characters in as sensually posed or in such compromisingly intimate body language? How much emphasis did Madoka place on the elaborate costumes and artful, intricate Magical Girl designs?

    Do you think the same is at play in Thunderbolt Fantasy?



  • Bishounen fan here, definitely interested in this show from that angle, though I personally can't stand Urobuchi (I just don't like his style… I don't like feeling like the writer is leaning on my shoulder telling me what to feel, like "Look! Isn't this SAD? Isn't this TRAGIC?" ... no, just show me the story and let me decide for myself. Obviously it's a matter of opinion - I feel the same way about the composer Puccini, who, obviously, tons of people love (for those who don't know opera, he did La Boheme).)

    But. What the world needs is more long-haired pretty boys. Those sports shows? No. They look like normal high school guys. Because they are normal high school guys. Where are all the long-haired prince anime? We need those back.
    This has gorgeous long-haired boys in fancy clothes. That's good.



  • @Fiammetta:

    Bishounen fan here, definitely interested in this show from that angle, though I personally can't stand Urobuchi (I just don't like his style… I don't like feeling like the writer is leaning on my shoulder telling me what to feel, like "Look! Isn't this SAD? Isn't this TRAGIC?" ... no, just show me the story and let me decide for myself.)

    I find that interesting, especially given that melodrama is par for the course in many of these sorts of shows. Folken Fanel's tragedy with his brother is as predictable as it is deliciously melodramatic, as is the cast of X and Tokyo Babylon. While I would agree some of his plots emerge from contrivance, I find the ideas they exercise and expose to be of core importance (e.g. the role of society's conception of justice places on its social conditions; the value of human freedom in a world where the only choices are to sign one's life away to a Faustian bargain or drift through life numb to the bigger picture). Of course, I'm a big goober for DEEP PHILOSOPHICAL PLOTTING PLOTS, so bear this bias in mind.

    Thunderbolt Fantasy appears to be little more than a wuxia melodrama, though - characters are broad strokes and archetypal storytelling. Knowing Urobuchi, there are likely nuances and complications which will keep things from being too simplistic. It remains to be seen, but i will watch with interest.



  • . . . which is why I don't like X ^_^;; Code Geass is like X if X made sense. Also K. K isn't in-your-face melodramatic either.

    @Sneebs:

    the value of human freedom in a world where the only choices are to sign one's life away to a Faustian bargain or drift through life numb to the bigger picture

    But that's not what life is. That's a setup philosophizing about the setup they've created.
    But it's not even that that was my problem with Madoka. You can have that story and still be subtle about it.
    I like subtlety. Code Geass has the big, bombastic moments, but it also has subtle things, scenes where the slightest hand movements or facial expressions speak volumes. Madoka might have those moments, too, I don't know. I haven't watched it closely enough. All I know is that the couple of times I did watch it, some scenes - the cleaning-chemicals cult suicide thing, the throwing the gem in the river thing - came across as far too heavy-handed, and it made me not want to watch it again.

    On that note, actually…

    ! Imagine if Schneizel had gotten Nina to build a time machine instead of a nuclear weapon.
    As for Fate/Zero, the whole franchise is just not my thing, although the character designs look gorgeous. I've heard that those are the only ones that are actually his works, and that the rest (Gargantia, Aldnoah.Zero) were later stated to be actually not his, or something?
    . . . Aldnoah.Zero was actually the opposite problem, though. It felt… empty. Like no one writing it really cared. It also felt like the easy version of other giant robot series - too black and white, the characters were fairly flat. As much as I love shows with princess characters, that one didn't grab me.


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