T-Mobile Binge On



  • hey, It would be nice if Funimation was a part of the T-mobile Binge On program. It makes videos at 480p not count towards your data cap.

    http://www.t-mobile.com/offer/binge-on-streaming-video.html



  • …as long as you don't care about watching everything in low 1990s definition all the time...

    You know a way to not count against data cap? WiFi...



  • @thegrandalliance:

    …as long as you don't care about watching everything in low 1990s definition all the time...

    You know a way to not count against data cap? WiFi...

    You know a 100% fool proof way to win the lottery? Get lucky.



  • @thegrandalliance:

    …as long as you don't care about watching everything in low 1990s definition all the time...

    You know a way to not count against data cap? WiFi...

    I assume you are referring to TV in the 1990's, as 480p streaming in the 1990's (even 1999) would have been glorious.

    WiFi isn't nearly as ubiquitous as cellular data, and even some places that advertise free Wi-Fi don't offer sufficient or and reliable enough bandwidth for streaming. (The WiFi connection at a place I was at earlier this morning couldn't even manage a short text document I had stored on Dropbox).



  • @EAEmployee:

    You know a 100% fool proof way to win the lottery? Get lucky.

    BTW I did that once, well almost. Got the second place prize in WA state lottery (which is only $1000), 5/6 of the numbers, and only 4 digits away from the millions. Used me own numbers. Took the money and went to "Animemazement Con" in North Carolina back in 2006 I think; to see "Kikuko Inoue" (VA of "Belldandy" in "Ah! My Goddess"). But yes, luck can be helpful times.

    @TheAncientOne:

    I assume you are referring to TV in the 1990's, as 480p streaming in the 1990's (even 1999) would have been glorious.

    You are referring to "progressive" part of the 480p… yes which did come out late 90s at best. Alas, my understanding was T-Mobile was capped at 480i not p, but I guess for the most part is same bandwidth wise, so could be incorrect nonetheless. Although technically progressive did exist during the 90s alas; and although yes it wasn't picked up until early 2000s mainstream, it is so nonetheless.

    WiFi isn't nearly as ubiquitous as cellular data, and even some places that advertise free Wi-Fi don't offer sufficient or and reliable enough bandwidth for streaming. (The WiFi connection at a place I was at earlier this morning couldn't even manage a short text document I had stored on Dropbox).

    True, but alas my interpretation on "how to use the Internet" is perhaps a bit outdated: You should be streaming at home, or otherwise a well-stable location, and not just anywhere. Using short term, or mobile focused (like navigation/communication) on-the-go is fine… however if you intend to sit down and watch hours of Anime or otherwise, it should be at home using "free" WiFi vs a data capped cellular one.

    Of course, this is simply a way to maximize efficiency. Granted, many young people are willing to pay ridiculous sums of $$$ for convenience these days; then complain they don't make enough money at their employment, alas the irony of it so...



  • @thegrandalliance:

    You are referring to "progressive" part of the 480p… yes which did come out late 90s at best. Alas, my understanding was T-Mobile was capped at 480i not p, but I guess for the most part is same bandwidth wise, so could be incorrect nonetheless. Although technically progressive did exist during the 90s alas; and although yes it wasn't picked up until early 2000s mainstream, it is so nonetheless.

    No, I'm not referring to progressive, as that was always standard for streamed video (interlaced would cause too many problems with streams).
    Perhaps you don't remember, but one would have been hard pressed to find a site streaming with 480 vertical lines of resolution in the late 90's. Flash didn't add video until version 6, released in 2002. Before then, streaming was a hodgepodge of formats (remember RealVideo?). Even 360p would have been considered "high resolution", and relatively few people would have been able to play even that. (Keep in mind broadband penetration in the US was still in the single digits as late as 1999: http://www.websiteoptimization.com/bw/0403/ ).



  • @TheAncientOne:

    No, I'm not referring to progressive, as that was always standard for streamed video (interlaced would cause too many problems with streams).
    Perhaps you don't remember, but one would have been hard pressed to find a site streaming with 480 vertical lines of resolution in the late 90's

    AAAAAAH I get it… we are talking past each other: I am not talking about Internet stream quality of the 1990s. I am rather talking about the overall TV picture quality that existed in 1990s.

    When I meant "Standard Definition" in my first post above... I meant TV broadcast, NOT streaming. Yes, streaming tech came like 10 years later in 2005 or whenever. When I mean SD I mean that, the quality of the T-Mobile stream is == to the resolution of a 1990s TV broadcast; not what the Internet had back then. I am comparing relative max picture quality with technology available at the time, and not comparing the progression of streaming resolution.

    That would make sense then... I do presume you will understand my OP now.


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