Is there a way for Funimation to take down illegal sites?



  • I'm just wondering if there is a way for Funimation to take down sites such as kissanime, as they are obviously hurting the industry. I would think that Funimation has lawyers that can take down sites like this, right? In my head it seems pretty simple, which I doubt is the case, but what would be stopping Funi to do this?



  • Yes, Kissanime and other sites are indeed illegal and hurt the anime industry. Unfortunately, it is very hard to find them. Oftentimes their servers are overseas and they take measures to hide their location. It is possible for companies like Funimation to take them to court for copyright infringement and other charges, but only if they can serve them and it is also hard to collect damages from such cases. In fact this has happened in the past (including one lawsuit that wound up being very embarrassing for Funimation). Such sites also violate several criminal laws and can be punished in criminal court, but by and large law enforcement agencies are not concerned with people who steal anime. They are more willing to spend time and resources going after people who steal big budget movies and American TV shows. Also, when a site like Kissanime or TPB are taken down, they just move to a new location, both physically and on the web.



  • I have always disliked websites like kissanime.

    because of them subscription prices rise, and will continue to do so in the future!



  • There are other things Funimation could do that would probably be easier. For example, if one goes into the Windows Store on a device supporting it (i.e, Windows 8, 10, Phone), you'll find an app called "AnimeHub" that specifically states it is a client for the fansub website mentioned in this thread.

    I would expect Microsoft to respond to a notice from Funimation that have an app in their store that infringes on their rights. There are also another two apps (both with "Anime Tube" in the name) that I'll wager are also pulling from pirate sources.



  • Thank you for supporting the anime industry. ^_^ The best thing you can do as a fan of anime is to not go on those sites and to report them to us. If you'd also like to send a little money Japan's way, you can watch AVOD from legal sources, subscribe to legal sources that pay royalties to Japan, and buy legit (non bootleg) home video releases and merchandise of anime. All of these support the anime industry in Japan.

    To report illegal streaming sites, go to www.funimation.com/support and choose "General - Legal & Copyright Infringement" as the reason for contact.



  • I know I've stated before my dislike for pirate sites (when the content is legally available, or soon to be legally available for purchase in the US), but before everyone goes all soapbox, how many people out there, including yourself and people who work, have worked, or will work for FUNimation, have watched content on one of those sites and STILL bought the series, or even bought the series BECAUSE you watched it free first?

    The answer sure as isn't "0."

    Should those sites be shut down? Technically, yes…. but there is a ton of revenue that comes in from people who "try before they buy." Is it right? No, but when rarely do you get more than 12 or 13 episodes for $40-$60, people aren't going to take that chance.

    FUNimation has a solution with a subscription model that includes streaming day and date (or earlier) than street date, but their competitors do not. You have to remember Aniplex, NISA, Viz, and Sentai make up more of those pirate site catalogs than FUNimation titles.

    It's a vicious cycle sure; high prices to offset costs which are affected by piracy, which exists because of the high prices.

    Until the anime publishers stop reaming the customers for upwards of $320 for a season (looking at you, Aniplex) the piracy isn't going anywhere.



  • @dougswisher:

    FUNimation has a solution with a subscription model that includes streaming day and date (or earlier) than street date, but their competitors do not. You have to remember Aniplex, NISA, Viz, and Sentai make up more of those pirate site catalogs than FUNimation titles.

    These days, almost everything from all four of those publishers can be watched on either Crunchyroll or Hulu. For international viewers, even Viewster and Daisuki are available.

    So that argument doesn't really hold water. :hmm:



  • Honestly, it would cost too much in failed litigation to bother and honestly, those sites are the gateway drug for subscribers. The dirty little secreat noone here has mentioned is crunchyroll started as a "pirate" fansub site before going "legit". And paying to stream content online. 10 to 15 years ago the only way you could see anime online was via fansub sites. In essence fansubs are largely responsible for the broad international fanbase that exists today. That having been said,
    Now that cr has gone legit and there are so many cheap leagal sights there is no reason not to subscribe to a legitimate service. Expecially, as the quality of subs is better here. God i remember whanting to gouge my eyballs out with a rusty spoon after a few of those fandubs back before we could get legal content online lmao :-)



  • @mattc138728172863:

    Yes, Kissanime and other sites are indeed illegal and hurt the anime industry. Unfortunately, it is very hard to find them. Oftentimes their servers are overseas and they take measures to hide their location. It is possible for companies like Funimation to take them to court for copyright infringement and other charges, but only if they can serve them and it is also hard to collect damages from such cases. In fact this has happened in the past (including one lawsuit that wound up being very embarrassing for Funimation). Such sites also violate several criminal laws and can be punished in criminal court, but by and large law enforcement agencies are not concerned with people who steal anime. They are more willing to spend time and resources going after people who steal big budget movies and American TV shows. Also, when a site like Kissanime or TPB are taken down, they just move to a new location, both physically and on the web.

    How would it be embarrassing? Is it the possibly the chance of losing?



  • @kiraandl:

    I'm just wondering if there is a way for Funimation to take down sites such as kissanime, as they are obviously hurting the industry. I would think that Funimation has lawyers that can take down sites like this, right?

    Just think logically for a moment…

    IF US/World Governments cannot disable ISIS/IslamicTerrorist sites, how do you think a private and small Funimation is gonna stop Anime sites? Even if you "attempt" to shut one down (the domain name resolution) you can easily redirect to another. Severs that are located outside the USA (such as China) cannot be disabled, only traffic diverted for a brief moment.



  • @seoud:

    because of them subscription prices rise, and will continue to do so in the future!

    That doesn't really hold truth. Rising subscription prices would just lead more people to use piracy sites because they can watch for free.



  • @ForlornBeliever:

    That doesn't really hold truth. Rising subscription prices would just lead more people to use piracy sites because they can watch for free.

    It does in theory though when you think about it, it all comes down to a supply and demand graph. Without illegal streaming sites more people would be forced to pay for a subscription, as more people begin subscribing the cost would marginally go down to lure more people to subscribe and increase revenue even more. The inverse is also true, as subscribers leave for other sites you raise the price to maintain revenues.

    The problem is this is all theory and what-ifs though, illegal streaming sites and black markets will always exist so there isn't a huge point to argue it other than illegal sites CAN be bad and are more often then not harmful to the industry.



  • @dougswisher:

    now I've stated before my dislike for pirate sites (when the content is legally available, or soon to be legally available for purchase in the US), but before everyone goes all soapbox, how many people out there, including yourself and people who work, have worked, or will work for FUNimation, have watched content on one of those sites and STILL bought the series, or even bought the series BECAUSE you watched it free first?

    The answer sure as isn't "0."

    Should those sites be shut down? Technically, yes…. but there is a ton of revenue that comes in from people who "try before they buy." Is it right? No, but when rarely do you get more than 12 or 13 episodes for $40-$60, people aren't going to take that chance.

    FUNimation has a solution with a subscription model that includes streaming day and date (or earlier) than street date, but their competitors do not. You have to remember Aniplex, NISA, Viz, and Sentai make up more of those pirate site catalogs than FUNimation titles.

    It's a vicious cycle sure; high prices to offset costs which are affected by piracy, which exists because of the high prices.

    Until the anime publishers stop reaming the customers for upwards of $320 for a season (looking at you, Aniplex) the piracy isn't going anywhere.

    not just the prices but as long as people keep complaining about the quality and quantity of anime piracy will continue. if someone is looking for a classic anime and they see that funi , crunchyroll or even hulu doesn't have it then they will go on an illegal site to watch it. i'll admit i used to use a lot of these sites but for details i wont get into i stopped.


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