DVD vs. Blu-Ray (What's the difference)



  • A question has been bugging me for like an eternity.
    Why are Blu-Ray Discs superior to DVD?
    To my opinion, they're the same as long as you take proper care of your discs.

    What are your opinions?



  • Have you ever watched a DVD and a bluray right after the other on an HD TV?

    Do that, then you'll know.

    Also, even for those who honestly can't see the difference in audio or video quality, blurays are much more durable and scratch-resistant than DVDs. That alone makes them better for long-term collectors.



  • Well lets say you do take perfect care of your discs and get no scratches on them at all. Blu ray discs will still last longer just because they have a longer lifetime.



  • @SpacemanHardy:

    Have you ever watched a DVD and a bluray right after the other on an HD TV?

    Do that, then you'll know.

    Also, even for those who honestly can't see the difference in audio or video quality, blurays are much more durable and scratch-resistant than DVDs. That alone makes them better for long-term collectors.

    What's scratch-resistance means?





  • @Zethus:

    What's scratch-resistance means?

    Basically it's less likely to be scratched accidentally.

    Other than Blu-Rays apparently being able to hold more data, I still don't see any difference.



  • I too wonder about this. Would I really notice the difference watching the discs on my computer (1920x1080)? Is the audio noticeably better as well? Is there a good program to rip BDs on to my harddrives (don't worry, I don't share them, it's just for easy access for myself)?



  • @ForlornBeliever:

    Other than Blu-Rays apparently being able to hold more data, I still don't see any difference.

    It really depends on the series and the company that is producing the Blurays. If the show was never made for higher resolutions then at best you're getting an upscale. However, when it comes to series that were actually animated for high definition it can be noticeable.

    For example, compare the DVD release of Kaichou wa Maid-sama! to its Bluray release. The DVD version looks like complete garbage in comparison. Mostly because Sentai, but still. If you really can't tell the difference then just look at the subtitles. Bluray allows cleaner looking subtitles whereas DVD subtitles look pixelated and jagged.
    @a.m.wolf:

    I too wonder about this. Would I really notice the difference watching the discs on my computer (1920x1080)? Is the audio noticeably better as well? Is there a good program to rip BDs on to my harddrives (don't worry, I don't share them, it's just for easy access for myself)?

    It's noticeable, but ripping Blurays is an iffy thing at best. It's one thing to get the data, but decrypting… not so much.



  • @CostlyAxis:

    It's noticeable, but ripping Blurays is an iffy thing at best. It's one thing to get the data, but decrypting… not so much.

    I suppose it's worth purchasing BDs then. I wouldn't mind the not being able to rip so much, as there's just something about having physical media on your shelf, like a well-curated library. I think my first series will be Claymore, though I will have to wait until I have a couple more in my shopping cart to warrant an order.



  • In general, I can find it easy to tell the difference in DVDs and BDs. As an example I recently had a problem with some error/scratch/something that made my Good Luck Girl BD skip, so I eventually just watched the episodes that were screwy on the DVD, then switched back. Could definitely tell the difference in sharpness, especially since I switched between them in such short time.

    Basically, the encoding of a DVD generally takes similar frames and just takes the ares that have movement and splices them together in order to save space. On the old tube TVs, not real noticeable. On non-upscaled HDTVs, very noticeable. Now when the player or TV can upscale, like the PS3/4, it makes it look much much better. However, there are still artifacts (things like squared areas that look strange around movement, film grain, and the like) and areas that do not look quite as sharp due to the aforementioned way that DVDs are encoded.
    BDs have a much higher storage space, so they can take each frame of the film and keep the entire picture at a very high resolution, which is why, while upscaled DVDs are not bad, BDs will look better.

    Now, on to the issue of older stuff that was not made in HD, how good it looks on BD will depend on what was done to each release. For instance, remastered movies like the Alien Quadrilogy, the Disney Diamond Collection, and some of the older Ghibli movies were done extremely well and look extremely good on BD. Then some are just upscaled and put on BD (some older anime or cartoons, for example), so the quality is better than DVD, but possibly could be similar to the PS3-upscaled DVD, depending on how they upscaled it. Then there are non-remastered movies, which are not cleaned up like the remastered ones, will look sharp, but have alot of artifacts and stuff on the screen that would be present on the film they used (a number of older movies are like this).

    BTW, did most of this from memory, so a few bits may be off here or there, but I believe it gives the (somewhat confusing) gist of it.



  • You'll need a stereo system to notice the audio, but the video is much sharper and cleaner almost every time.



  • @Unicron:

    BTW, did most of this from memory, so a few bits may be off here or there, but I believe it gives the (somewhat confusing) gist of it.

    Wow, very impressive Unicron! Thanks for the information!



  • I can never tell the difference, but I always try to watch 720p/1080p versions whenever possible, assuming the show was animated in HD, of course.



  • As I get enough shows to warrant an order, I'll be sure to post back here of my actual experience with BDs. Thanks for all of the information!


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