How 'bout a 'no-sub' streaming choice?



  • In case this is already available in other versions of Funi, I'm specifically talking about the web browser version.

    I'm not sure how many people would have an interest in this, but I really wish I had the option to watch what fansubbers refer to as the 'raws' of the shows. No sub or dub, just delivery of Japanese-language Anime to me here in the US. Watching Anime to keep my Japanese language listening skills sharp is not as effective when the translation is being provided to me at the bottom of the screen (plus the cognitive dissonance when the sub is not a literal translation kinda hurts)

    My dream streaming service would have, instead of the toggle between DUB and SUB, a three-way toggle. DUB, SUB and 日本語. Is there any chance of ever getting something like that?



  • @ericthefred:

    (plus the cognitive dissonance when the sub is not a literal translation kinda hurts)

    My dream streaming service would have, instead of the toggle between DUB and SUB, a three-way toggle. DUB, SUB and 日本語. Is there any chance of ever getting something like that?

    I as well feel your pain, as often there are huge differences in the subtitle translations of what's said versus what's written on the screen. But, however, you have the misfortune of getting anime from an American company based in a primarily English speaking language country. It would be rather pointless to provide an anime with no sense of production from a company that processes their product for American release. I'm sure if there were several hundred thousand viewers that spoke Japanese, then perhaps it would happen. Until then, my eyes will continue to bleed every time I hear someone say "Sensei" and the on screen text reads, "Akira-san," or a character is called for dinner, and answers with "Hai," and it's translated as "Sure, be right down!."



  • I've noticed the various "Hai" interpretations too :) It would be interesting to see the original, untranslated work.



  • @elux72:

    I've noticed the various "Hai" interpretations too :) It would be interesting to see the original, untranslated work.

    It would be very brief, highly repetitive, and in the case of longer sentences, basically word salad. Brevity is a key feature of Japanese, so a lot of words in sentences can be displaced or removed, and Japanese-speaking people still understand the context


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