Funi: You got the name wrong!



  • Just now noticed this show among your video offerings. I had the good fortune to watch it on Japanese TV, so hadn't seen the weirdness of the English title until now.

    祝福のカンパネラ (Shukufuku no Campanella) means "Campanella of Blessing" . So, why the heck did Funi turn the name around backwards? Weird, pointless decisions like this in the English market really bug me.



  • since that's how Nozomi Entertainment is releasing the show, it's very likely that's what they were told to go with by the Japanese rights holders



  • @ericthefred:

    Just now noticed this show among your video offerings. I had the good fortune to watch it on Japanese TV, so hadn't seen the weirdness of the English title until now.

    祝福のカンパネラ (Shukufuku no Campanella) means "Campanella of Blessing" . So, why the heck did Funi turn the name around backwards? Weird, pointless decisions like this in the English market really bug me.

    The "no" is a particle, and in this instance is used as an emphasis on the following word, "Campanella." It is certainly not, "of."

    Literally translated, the title would read, "Campanella's Blessing." While I agree that adding the "of the" to the title is sort of ignorant sounding, it's not that off from the literal translation.



  • "Blessing" can also be read as a verb, then it would be correct.



  • @Davidism:

    The "no" is a particle, and in this instance is used as an emphasis on the following word, "Campanella." It is certainly not, "of."

    Literally translated, the title would read, "Campanella's Blessing." While I agree that adding the "of the" to the title is sort of ignorant sounding, it's not that off from the literal translation.

    Sorry, gotta disagree with you. It most definitely means 'of' in this case, and in most cases where it does not make sense as a possessive. 'No' as an emphasis does not occur between nouns. Or, if taken as an apostrophe s, it would read Blessing's Campanella. Furthermore, (I went back and watched the OP to confirm this, since I vaguely remembered it being there) right under the Japanese Title, it says "La Campanella Della Benedizione" which is Italian for, you guessed it… "The Campenella of the Blessing."



  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gutCFMc5khY

    Seriously. Seems like a rather small, insignificant thing to get your jimmies rustled over.

    It's just a name. And whether you say it frontwards or backwards, the meaning is basically the same.



  • I'm not going to try and change your mind on this. But, there is absolutely no way to make a possession indicator (noun link, topic marker, and nominalizer) like "no" into the prepositional "of the." I mean, well… you can. But the context could come out all ass backwards. And considering that Japanese is spoken differently (subject-object-verb) than English (subject-verb-object), it would be very easy to take an everyday postpositional sentence and incorrectly change it into a prepositional sentence.

    Of course. "No" is not an apostrophe. But because the title of the anime reads, 祝福のカンパネラ. "no" as a noun link would be wrong. As would "no" as a topic marker. It certainly wouldn't work as a nominalizer like: 食べるのが大好き. Or as a nominalizer that makes the phrase into a question like: 車なの. So then the only way to literally translate the title of the show would be, in the possessive: "Campanella's Blessing."

    Whoever told you that "no" couldn't be used as a possessive between two nouns is either misinformed, or going by a really old set of Japanese grammar rules.



  • @ericthefred:

    Furthermore, (I went back and watched the OP to confirm this, since I vaguely remembered it being there) right under the Japanese Title, it says "La Campanella Della Benedizione" which is Italian for, you guessed it… "The Campenella of the Blessing."

    Implying that it is impossible for the Japanese visual novel company to not have impeccable skill at reading, writing, and translating Italian

    On one hand, Wikipedia literally translates the show's Japanese name as The Campanella of the Blessing

    On the other hand, Google translates La Campanella Della Benedizione as The Blessing of the Campanella

    So, I'm going to put that one on the Japanese VN writers being poor at translating Italian to Japanese

    Does The Campanella of the Blessing even make sense within the context of the show? Because as someone who hasn't watched it, that sentence doesn't really make any relevant sense to me, compared to The Blessing of the Campanella. Is a blessing even physically capable of having a little bell?



  • @Davidism:

    I'm not going to try and change your mind on this. But, there is absolutely no way to make a possession indicator (noun link, topic marker, and nominalizer) like "no" into the prepositional "of the." I mean, well… you can. But the context could come out all ass backwards. And considering that Japanese is spoken differently (subject-object-verb) than English (subject-verb-object), it would be very easy to take an everyday postpositional sentence and incorrectly change it into a prepositional sentence.

    Of course. "No" is not an apostrophe. But because the title of the anime reads, 祝福のカンパネラ. "no" as a noun link would be wrong. As would "no" as a topic marker. It certainly wouldn't work as a nominalizer like: 食べるのが大好き. Or as a nominalizer that makes the phrase into a question like: 車なの. So then the only way to literally translate the title of the show would be, in the possessive: "Campanella's Blessing."

    Whoever told you that "no" couldn't be used as a possessive between two nouns is either misinformed, or going by a really old set of Japanese grammar rules.

    I did not say "no" can't be used as a possessive between two nouns. I said that "no" cannot be used as an emphasis between two nouns (replying to what you stated in your first reply to me.) "No" placed between two nouns creates a genitive phrase.

    When translating a genitive phrase to English, の generally becomes "of" unless it either makes better sense as a possessive or the English noun has an "n" form (for example アメリカの usually translates to the English adjective "American"). However, you also need to rearrange the order of the nouns. You place the translation of 祝福 (blessing) behind "of" and カンパネラ (campanella) before it. Hence, it becomes "Campanella of Blessing." Which, if you translated the Italian word to English as well, could be read "Little Bells of Blessing", "Little Bell of Blessings" or a number of similar ways, by pluralizing, adding in articles, etc.

    But there is absolutely no way 祝福のカンパネラ can mean "Blessing of the Campanella". That is simply not possible. The only possible explanation (other than the intentional change to the title that I'm suspecting actually happened) is that whoever translated it did so one word at a time with a dictionary and didn't know they needed to change Japanese word order to English word order. Which would be very weird if it were true, since Funi has plenty of translators on staff who would most certainly know better.



  • @Riles:

    Implying that it is impossible for the Japanese visual novel company to not have impeccable skill at reading, writing, and translating Italian

    On one hand, Wikipedia literally translates the show's Japanese name as The Campanella of the Blessing

    On the other hand, Google translates La Campanella Della Benedizione as The Blessing of the Campanella

    So, I'm going to put that one on the Japanese VN writers being poor at translating Italian to Japanese

    Does The Campanella of the Blessing even make sense within the context of the show? Because as someone who hasn't watched it, that sentence doesn't really make any relevant sense to me, compared to The Blessing of the Campanella. Is a blessing even physically capable of having a little bell?

    Implying nothing of the sort, only noting that the Italian name given tends to corroborate what I am saying and contradict Funi's English title.

    Guys, I fully admit my Japanese is rusty (that's why I've taken to watching Anime once again, since I've just been away from Japan too long and I was only so-so at best when I was there) but it isn't THIS rusty. I am very confident I still have basic grammar skills. It's vocabulary and listening skills that have been withering.

    Japanese does not have a true possessive. Instead it has the particle の "no", which, as I just noted, creates a genitive phrase when it occurs between two nouns. This can be used to express possession, but can also relate the second noun (in this case, 'Campanella') to the first noun in other senses. Some textbooks will call these other senses "-no adjectives" to try to explain these other senses, and this is actually a case of a so-called '-no adjective'. (Translating the English adjective "American" as I mentioned above as アメリカの is another example.)

    If I use 'blessing' as an adjectival noun, I can translate this yet one more way, and maybe this one works better since it removes any resemblance to a possessive. The Blessing Campanella, or, The Little Blessing Bell.


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