FUNiimation Kickstarter



  • Maybe I kickstarter to help dub more episodes or start up old shows. A big company can get a lot of money since regular people can get over $20,000.



  • Nah, that's not how Kickstarter works



  • That isn't going to work at all. Best option is to buy as many copies as possible. If you have like a million dollars, you can buy virtually every copy of their release.



  • Kids these days….they don't even take the time to learn how things work do they!? Oy vey!



  • Yeah, I'm pretty sure starting up a Kickstarter for someone else, essentially, is pretty much against the ToS. In addition, a Kickstarter for NEW episodes wouldn't work, because we have nothing at all to do with new episodes being made. But as far as releasing older content…

    It can be pretty expensive to dub and release things. I genuinely wonder if there would be enough donations to support a project like that, even if we did it, which I don't even know if we could/would do.

    What do you guys think? If we had some decent reward tiers and wanted to dub/re-dub and release some older shows, what kind of things would you want to see? How much would you be willing to (theoretically, of course) donate? Would you essentially just prepay for the release, or would you want to donate at a higher level for cool stuff?



  • I'd support a kick starter for a Tatami Galaxh Dub or more Case Closed Seasons/Movies.



  • EVS subscriptions would be a good tier bonus unlock (as you can tell by my distinct lack of one)

    I would pay money because dubs, but it'd depend more on the rewards than the actual dub/re-dub itself, since I'm still of the belief that everything should be dubbed when licensed (i.e., OniAi, half of Sentai's library)

    Only peripherally related but man I am so thrilled that Sentai is going back and dubbing Love, Chuunibyo, and Other Delusions



  • @CJ:

    What do you guys think? If we had some decent reward tiers and wanted to dub/re-dub and release some older shows, what kind of things would you want to see? How much would you be willing to (theoretically, of course) donate? Would you essentially just prepay for the release, or would you want to donate at a higher level for cool stuff?

    If you can get rewards like CDs, art books, figures, wall scrolls/posters, and whatnot then I'd be tempted to pledge more than just basically pre-order the physical release. I increased my pledges from my starting amount for both Time of Eve and Little Witch Academia 2 specifically because they added rewards that tickled my fancy. I think I'd cap out at $100 though unless I really REALLY love the show in question. I mean, I loved LWA and still capped out at $100 for its sequel (which is starting to be worked on now, yay!).



  • @Riles:

    Nah, that's not how Kickstarter works

    Do you even know what a kickstarter is?



  • @Soundmonkey44:

    Kids these days….they don't even take the time to learn how things work do they!? Oy vey!

    Do you even know how things work, apparently not.



  • @lucky_frog:

    Do you even know what a kickstarter is?

    A Kickstarter is intended for people who require crowdfunding for content they themselves are creating. When giving someone money, they have to make the promise that the money is being used for the content

    There are two problems with your plan. For one, you're raising money to be donated to a different company entirely. You're not creating any content yourself, you're just giving your money away. For another, having the money does not mean you now own the resources to what you want to license and dub. You still have to contact the company and try to work out a deal, and oftentimes, a hard dollar sign is not the only thing required in licensing. So what do you do if you get all the money from a Kickstarter and then can't complete a deal? Everyone's money is lost and you're a fraud. That's precisely what Kickstarter is trying to prevent

    Do you know what a Kickstarter is?



  • @Riles:

    A Kickstarter is intended for people who require crowdfunding for content they themselves are creating. When giving someone money, they have to make the promise that the money is being used for the content

    There are two problems with your plan. For one, you're raising money to be donated to a different company entirely. You're not creating any content yourself, you're just giving your money away. For another, having the money does not mean you now own the resources to what you want to license and dub. You still have to contact the company and try to work out a deal, and oftentimes, a hard dollar sign is not the only thing required in licensing. So what do you do if you get all the money from a Kickstarter and then can't complete a deal? Everyone's money is lost and you're a fraud. That's precisely what Kickstarter is trying to prevent

    Do you know what a Kickstarter is?

    Actually I was saying FUNimation can do a kickstarter.



  • That doesn't change the fact that they would be raising money for something that they did not create and don't necessarily have the required resources to make a license happen simply by volume of money

    For stuff like Anime Sols and Wakfu, they already had the show licensed for the region before they began their crowdfunding. The same would have to happen for Funimation - they would have to have the show already licensed before they could start a Kickstarter, and by then, what kind of expenses are there? Employee pay? You really shouldn't be spending your Kickstarter money on salary, unless your company's on the verge of bankruptcy



  • Now now, settle down children. I don't want to have to get the duct tape out again. :P

    In my own personal opinion, a Kickstarter campaign for an anime project certainly can work, if done properly. Kick Heart and Little Witch Academia have proven that Japanese production companies can crowdfund complete projects from the ground up, Time of EVE has proven that the production companies can fund home releases and English dubs for their own existing projects themselves, and recently All the Anime's Mai Mai Miracle campaign has proven that a third party licensor can license, produce, dub, and distribute an older film via crowdfunding. So the idea is not impossible.

    Trying to crowdfund an entire 13 or 24 episode series, however, is probably out of the question. The amount of money that would need to be raised is well beyond what the average Kickstarter crowd is willing to donate. Instead, it would probably be a good idea to start with an older OVA or film, something that has been generally overlooked but might still garner enough attention to raise the funds needed.

    Someone brought this idea up a few months ago, and I thought it was a good one: The 3rd Semester OVAs for School Rumble have been entirely overlooked. They consist of only two 25 minute episodes that came out all the way back in 2008, so I don't think they'd be too expensive or tricky to get a license for. Now granted, School Rumble never was that big of a seller for FUNimation, but it does have it's fair share of devoted fans. It might make for a good jumping off project for FUNimation to test out the crowdfunding process.

    The tiers would go something like this:

    • Bare Minimum Funding - Sub-only DVD release
    • First Stretch Goal - English dub
    • 2nd Stretch Goal - Japanese bonus materials & features (provided that any exist)
    • 3rd Stretch Goal - English voice actor commentaries
    • 4th Stretch Goal - Upgrade to deluxe packaging w/ chipboard box and artbook
    • 5th Stretch Goal - Commentaries upgraded to video commentaries
    • 6th Stretch Goal - Brand new exclusive interview with the Japanese director & cast

    As far as rewards go, you can start off small with things like free EVS subscriptions, digital wallpapers, stickers, postcards and the like, then move up to the medium rewards like t-shirts, plushies, lithographs, and of course a copy of the DVD itself. Then you move on to the exclusive stuff, like a DVD or poster autographed by the entire cast or an exclusive sketch from the original creator, and finish off with the BIG stuff like a tour of the FUNimation studios, a cameo part in the English dub, or even a trip to Japan to meet the original creator (travel and lodging expenses not included).

    I think, if nothing else, it would make for a neat experiment for FUNimation to try. If it fails, no real harm done. If it succeeds though, then it could potentially change the way we license anime.



  • @lucky_frog:

    Do you even know how things work, apparently not.

    Don't do that. Seriously, you will be reported to a mod/admin, and you will have your thread closed. Acting like a petulant child doesn't get anyone anywhere.



  • If you guys wanna Kickstart a redub for Escaflowne, I will totally throw money at you.

    I think giving out production materials(like autographed scripts or whatnot) or EVS subscriptions would be pretty cool for stretch goals. That's something that Funimation would be in a unique position to hand out.



  • @Renzokuken:

    a redub for Escaflowne

    What was wrong with the dub? (though I barely remember it)



  • @MetalOverlord:

    What was wrong with the dub? (though I barely remember it)

    Well for one thing, the original Broadcast Masters that Bandai used for the dub didn't include the director's cut footage that was added on the Japanese home video release. There are literally entire scenes without any English dialogue.



  • @CJ:

    Yeah, I'm pretty sure starting up a Kickstarter for someone else, essentially, is pretty much against the ToS. In addition, a Kickstarter for NEW episodes wouldn't work, because we have nothing at all to do with new episodes being made. But as far as releasing older content…

    It can be pretty expensive to dub and release things. I genuinely wonder if there would be enough donations to support a project like that, even if we did it, which I don't even know if we could/would do.

    What do you guys think? If we had some decent reward tiers and wanted to dub/re-dub and release some older shows, what kind of things would you want to see? How much would you be willing to (theoretically, of course) donate? Would you essentially just prepay for the release, or would you want to donate at a higher level for cool stuff?

    Personally, if you could manage to get the rights, and access to the original film, I'd pay big money to see the entire Gall Force series re-scanned in HD, with restored picture and audio quality. A new dub wouldn't be a bad idea either..

    Hell I'd settle for a DVD rescan/remaster release if it at least meant going back and fixing all the bad edits that screwed up the telecine of stuff like Destruction & Stardust War, Eternal Story is rife with rainbows, chroma bleeding and dirt / faded colors as well.

    I own the DVD Remastered (and incomplete) box set from the early 2000's and I can't believe I paid almost $100 for it given the quality of the films. Stardust War probably fared best out of the 4 in the set, but Eternal Story looks almost like a VHS copy job.
    But that's just me.



  • @Renzokuken:

    If you guys wanna Kickstart a redub for Escaflowne, I will totally throw money at you.

    I think giving out production materials(like autographed scripts or whatnot) or EVS subscriptions would be pretty cool for stretch goals. That's something that Funimation would be in a unique position to hand out.

    I know FUNimation doesn't own all of these, but since we are on the subject I would like more of Sgt. Frog, lucky star, and ghost stories.



  • If you're interested in recommending anime for Funimation to license then you'll want to do it in this thread:
    http://www.funimation.com/forum/showthread.php?78-Anime-Recommendations-Thread
    Just a head's up Funimation never takes recommendations on which anime to license, while it may be cathartic to ask for certain anime to be licensed it's entirely pointless.
    Licensing anime is a pretty convoluted process that deals with a lot of business relationships across a lot of international groups, license acquisitions are purchased due to market metrics, availability, and never never ever because someone wants it.


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