NO CLOSED CAPTION??? Huh?



  • I'm happy to watch on Star Blazers that Is my favorite since teenage time. BIG PROBLEM is NO Closed Caption on it. I did check new app on computer, Apple TV, and iPhone - Setting turn on CC. I don't understand what do they set up. I required by the LAW as I'm deaf. Please do something on CC. Not waste my money for next monthly.... Is they (FUNIMATION) play around or party, huh? FCC will watch...



  • Correct me if I’m wrong, but closed captions are only available for shows with a home video release. I don’t know why, but that’s just how it is.



  • Yeah, closed captions are only available for show thay have been released on home video. My guess for why you dont seen the m for simuldubs is because there's a chance the dialogue could change at some point and its probably more efficient to wait and see. If you dont want to wait, head over to crunchyroll and watch it there



  • Actually, the FCC does not regulate captioning of home videos, DVDs or video games and Closed Captioning is only required for video programming distributors (VPDs) - cable operators, broadcasters, satellite distributors and other multi-channel video programming distributors - to close caption their TV programs.

    Source



  • This is probably more than what you wanted to know, but CC only applies to material which has been broadcast on TV (or with only that intent). Internet is still not covered, but there are legal precedents which require specific timelines of internet streamed material. Home video falls into this category. Honestly, with the use of TV apps, and things like Roku, which are designed specifically to play the material, Funimation is walking a VERY thin line. As a safety precaution, because it would only require anyone to make a legal comlaint (meaning in federal court) in order to make a comparison to other streaming services which have been classified as a public media broadcast, I would personally advise some sort of notice be placed in the terms of service regarding the streaming service. This is held accountable by the Americans with Disabilities Act. However, there is a contingency I'll explain in a minute which would exclude a PORTION of the streamed material.

    In the case of shows like Dragonball Super or Black Clover which are airing on TV prior to home video release (covered by ADA), they are required to have CC on their internet streams within 15 days of the television broadcast. There is no "skirting" this requirement regardless of any other legal filing. This is required by the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility act.

    Having said all that, anything which doesn't fall under the classes mentioned above (never been on TV or released on home video) is not required. As for those videos, in order to be able to stream without CC, and not risk the legality mentioned in the first paragraph, Funimation would only have to show it to be an economic burden to CC their video streams prior to home release. I'm nearly positive this is what they've done for their shows prior to home video release. Simply put, "paying for CC to be added twice (once for the initial stream (technically pre-production) and once for the finalized material for home video release doesn't make sense" is all that would have to be stated.

    As for the Terms of Service, in order to make sure that no litigation had a leg to stand on, I would advise Funimation to place something along the lines of "Simuldubs are a pre-production product and may be edited for final content prior to public release." This is probably already there in some format, but I'm not going to read them again in order to find out.

    Edit: What is actually more questionable is why nobody has taken this up with Youtube yet with regards to things like "review videos". If a clip of a video is shown which has aired on TV (or with that specific intent, such as home video), CC for the video in the language of the broadcast (meaning that if Japanese is the language spoken in the clip, then Japanese CC has to be added) becomes a requirement for the entire video within 15 days under the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act. Since Youtube has a user agreement which restricts the use of copyright material, the poster would be accountable for any legal issues as soon as Youtube shows that agreement, and responsible for the associated fines. It's an easy enough fix to add subtitles to those videos, using something like Aegisub, but nobody is doing it.

    Just a hint for any reviewers, in order to get around the Japanese CC, it would only require English CC and specifying in the title that the review was of the subtitled version.



  • @Getchman said in NO CLOSED CAPTION??? Huh?:

    Yeah, closed captions are only available for show thay have been released on home video. My guess for why you dont seen the m for simuldubs is because there's a chance the dialogue could change at some point and its probably more efficient to wait and see. If you dont want to wait, head over to crunchyroll and watch it there

    unfortunately, they aren't available on the majority of Blurays/DVDs I have bought from Funimation.

    This seems to pop up as a request at least once a month



  • @HOOfan1 said in NO CLOSED CAPTION??? Huh?:

    unfortunately, they aren't available on the majority of Blurays/DVDs I have bought from Funimation.

    I believe the assumption is that the presence of subtitles being available on the disk works as a "self-implementing exemption".



  • @pleco_breeder said in NO CLOSED CAPTION??? Huh?:

    @HOOfan1 said in NO CLOSED CAPTION??? Huh?:

    unfortunately, they aren't available on the majority of Blurays/DVDs I have bought from Funimation.

    I believe the assumption is that the presence of subtitles being available on the disk works as a "self-implementing exemption".

    but those subtitles are for the Japanese script.

    Seems dubtitles are something that at least a few fans are asking for. This is the 4th time I've seen them requested in the 8 months I've been posting here.



  • @HOOfan1 I don't doubt that they're being asked for. I've seen the requests myself. I'm simply referring to the legality which the original poster mentioned. There is no legal requirement that makes for a "middle of the road" solution. They are required to included a written format "CC" for hearing impaired which matches to what is happening on the screen at that time, in a way that the intended audience can understand. Subtitles meet the legal requirement.

    Dubtitles may be something which the audience wants, and has every right to want. However, there is no legal requirement for the producer to provide as long as a written format is available.

    It seems that every couple months someone comes onto the forum thinking they've found a legal loophole to force Funimation to provide what they want. Just in the last few months I can remember "Freedom of Speech" regarding localization, "False Advertising" regarding Dragonball Super, and now "FCC mandates" regarding dubtitles. All of these were instances where only a partial understanding of what the law requires was attempting to be used as the final word. In reality, even though the entirety hadn't been thought through, only the False Advertising claim really held any water, but the requirements by the users weren't being met to make it do so.

    If asking for dubtitles is going to be the next trend, the users have every right to ask Funimation to add them to their media. However, before the trend becomes to try to brandish legal jargon in an effort to claim it as a "right", it's important that everyone is aware that there is no legal requirement for them. The currently accepted laws which govern the requirement are both mentioned in my previous post, and it is possible that someone can find some other way of negotiating a path after having read them, but on the surface it seems that Funimation has their bases covered.

    The only place that I can currently think of a flaw in their method is with this current season. Tokyo Ghoul Re: is streaming on both Funimation and Hulu as a same day dub. If it were streaming only on Funimation, the "all materials are pre-production, not finalized" clause would cover them completely. However, using an outside streaming service which would definitely fall under the same classification as Netflix means that they're going to have to provide some sort of "CC" format within the 15 day mandate. Funimation is hosting the subtitle which would suffice for this, but I don't have, or have access to Hulu to know if they're providing a subtitle version or not. A written format simply has to be made available for the hearing impaired.

    I mention Netflix because they got in trouble in a BIG way about 5 years ago because CC wasn't being provided for their programming. Although it was never added to any law, it set precedent for streaming services to potentially be viewed as broadcast when it was the primary purpose of the business.


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