Why I boycott funimation



  • Lately there has been a trend of defending bad localization on the basis of localization being hard. A perfect word for word translation is impossible, but that shouldn't be used as a license to go wild and do whatever. I know most people won't read this, most will do the typical fanboy thing and mock me for caring in the first place, but never boycott in silence. And when I say boycott, I mean I've spent roughly $700 or so on anime in the last two months alone, and not a dime on funimation.
    I'm not completely unforgiving, or unsympathetic, but let's think of this in terms of a coffee shop.

    Example:

    You go to a coffee shop and order caramel macchiato, the barista brings you an americano by mistake. If the barista apologizes and offers to fix the mistake, all is forgiven. If the barista starts making excuses about how their job is so difficult and stressful instead, I have no sympathy. Sincerity is important. This is the key factor, were they doing their best and making an honest mistake or slacking off doing whatever they felt like? It's an important detail, and making excuses is slacker mentality. Getting defensive instead of owning up means that the mistake wasn't acknowledged and will happen again.

    Now let's consider the enhancement argument:

    You go to a coffee shop and order a caramel macchiato, the barista adds whipped topping to the beverage. Some people will consider it a pleasant surprise, other people will be bothered with not getting their exact order. The whipped topping affects the flavor, for some it might make it too sweet, or may mask and dilute the flavor they were seeking, others may enjoy it. This is a grey area and is very much hit or miss, it should be tread lightly.

    Now imagine if the barista decides to be artistic and add two pumps of chai and one pump of amaretto flavoring, the drink can no longer be called a caramel macchiato, it's an entirely new creation that nobody asked for. And someone will always say 'but what about Ghost Stories', forgetting that GS was a parody, it never had a true localization. People will then defend the lack of a faithful localization by calling the show trash. As someone who has been ridiculed for my hobbies my entire life, mocked for liking anime as a whole, this smug attitude of 'it sucked anyway, so who cares?' pisses me off. Guess what people used to say about Evangelion, Cowboy Bebop, or Trigun back in the day? 'They are just stupid cartoons, get a real hobby'. Do you really want something you care about and invest hundreds of dollars on handled by people with such a disrespectful attitude towards the product they are selling? I sure as hell don't.

    Now let's consider injecting politics:

    You walk in to the coffee shop wearing a Bernie Sanders shirt and order a caramel macchiato, the barista brings you the drink, looks you in the eye, spits in it, then says 'make america great again'. Injecting politics is exactly that, spitting on the product while waving a flag. I've heard people try to argue over which politics are being inserted or mocked and I could care less. We all have our political views and we all think we have it right, but there's a time and a place for the discussion, and rewriting someone else's work and forcing it on people is the wrong way to go about it. This is extremely unprofessional. In any other profession this would get you fired on the spot.

    A business that allows this needs to be held accountable. Recent and not so recent events with funimation leave a lot of speculation and name dropping, but ultimately its funimations responsibility to do something about it. With that said, funimations most recent attempts to deflect criticism by playing the victim instead of taking responsibility is insulting.

    Localization and culturalization:

    Localization is minimizing miscommunication on account of language differences. Consider the word balls, it can refer to sports equipment or genitalia, localization is ensuring that statements are phrased in such a way that people don't get the wrong idea. Culturalization is whitewashing, it's where you get all the arguments of 'Japanese experience in English' excuses. Localization changes need to be a last resort, done when necessary, instead of being treated as a license to disregard the original work and do whatever.

    Imagine having all the French words and references removed or "localized" in 'Les Miserables'. Imagine if they replaced the French revolution with the American Revolution to be more relevant to the target audience and give the French experience in English. As someone who has done theatre, I find it baffling how overzealous this is with Japanese entertainment in comparison to everything else.

    Just watch subs:

    Every time people point out dub inaccuracies they get told 'if you care about accuracy, watch sub'. There seems to be a broad misconception that people who prefer dubs don't care about accuracy. While that may be true of some localization teams, it does not reflect the views of the audience who put up with it. Every time people resort to subs for accuracy, the dub failed. The amount of people wanting to learn Japanese just so they can avoid this crap speaks volumes on the failure of localization.

    There is no reason for the sub only crowd to support an industry that treats them with contempt. Funimation, Viz, Sentai, and all other companies licensing anime could go out of business and the sub only crowd wouldn't notice. They would easily get by on fan translations which were there before the industry and can survive without it. Hell, my first time watching Kenshin was on a friends fan translated VHS collection, before online streaming was a thing. It wasn't until a disclaimer by the fans translating it apologized for a few mistakes half way in that I realized it was a fan project. Perfect translation is impossible, but at least the fan teams are making an effort. To fight piracy you need to offer a better product, but as it stands people are being pushed towards piracy between crap dubs and the clusterfuck that is "premium" streaming services.

    Lastly, two pet peeves I have, not related to my boycotting funimation, but this is as good a place as any to throw it out there. One; translating 'chan' as little. If honorifics are relevant (key word) then leave them in, we've had 'san' since the karate kid came out in the 80's so it's not exactly new or unheard of (Hell, funimation kept them in Basilisk, back when it seemed like they actually gave a damn, one of the best dubs of its time, of all time if you don't consider voice acting improvements). Two; using southern accents to represent the kansai dialect is absolute cringe. Seeing someone in traditional Japanese clothing talking like a redneck is absolutely jarring. Seriously, why hasn't anyone tried representing it with engurish?

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  • It's too bad your boycott doesn't include their website...



  • Okay dude at this point you're here talking about your Funimation boycott to a crowd of people who will probably, almost DEFINITELY continue to use Funimation because this is a god damn Funimation forum and the odds are people who would bother to read this regularly are people who enjoy Funimation shows and dubs.

    Like this is you right now.

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  • tldr: I'm not happy with Funimation's choices when they have to alter the dub script due to cultural incompatibilities / writer preferences etc. So I'm not buying Funimation's home video releases and such.

    Let me be honest, while I'm not as outspoken as you are about Funimation's translation choices for dubs, I normally don't watch dubs. I'll watch the dub at least once when I get a home video release to see if I prefer it over the sub, but it's not a big selling point for me, as I prefer subs. While I think a whole set of fandom has been making mountains out of molehills over some of the dub script choices as of late, You are entitled to not be pleased and boycott all you want.



  • @Series5Ranger said in Why I boycott funimation:

    tldr: I'm not happy with Funimation's choices when they have to alter the dub script due to cultural incompatibilities / writer preferences etc. So I'm not buying Funimation's home video releases and such.

    Let me be honest, while I'm not as outspoken as you are about Funimation's translation choices for dubs, I normally don't watch dubs. I'll watch the dub at least once when I get a home video release to see if I prefer it over the sub, but it's not a big selling point for me, as I prefer subs. While I think a whole set of fandom has been making mountains out of molehills over some of the dub script choices as of late, You are entitled to not be pleased and boycott all you want.

    I find I end up prefering which ever version I watch first



  • You are entitled to not be pleased and boycott all you want.

    Just don''t expect me to buy into your poor arguments.



  • I just think at this point you are making a mountain out of nothing honestly. Prison school went too far and they apologized. Nothing else they changed actually felt impactful. I'm going to be honest and say i never notices these controversial changes when I watch FUNi's dub and only actually see them when people bring them up.But hey if these 2 or 3 changes in 1 or 2 anime makes you feel cheated you have every right to not give FUNi any money. I personally think FUNimation produced some od their best dubs recently, so I sure as hell won't boycott.

    Also do remember, if you try to convince people about something like this, this isn't the right place. People here won't agree with you. I sure won't with some of the absolutely disgusting and awful things you said. Go try a place with people watching sub stuff, I'm sure you'll get a little traction.



  • Now let's consider injecting politics:

    You walk in to the coffee shop wearing a Bernie Sanders shirt and order a caramel macchiato, the barista brings you the drink, looks you in the eye, spits in it, then says 'make america great again'. Injecting politics is exactly that, spitting on the product while waving a flag. I've heard people try to argue over which politics are being inserted or mocked and I could care less. We all have our political views and we all think we have it right, but there's a time and a place for the discussion, and rewriting someone else's work and forcing it on people is the wrong way to go about it. This is extremely unprofessional. In any other profession this would get you fired on the spot.

    I'd be fired for spitting in someone's drink. There isn't anything about me having my own personal beliefs and sharing them with other people. I hate it when people bring it up in the first place. No one will EVER agree on it and will only make me angry because I have to talk about it. Hell I'm glad Trump is president, not because I like to see the world burn, but because he is showing everyone the things that is wrong. Like the ethics on OWNING A BUSINESS as leader of a nation. He may not be the greatest person ever but if he is inspiring activism, I view that as a plus.

    And when I say boycott, I mean I've spent roughly $700 or so on anime in the last two months alone, and not a dime on funimation.

    And I'm sure they don't care anyway. You clearly aren't the target.

    And if you have issues with politics in your anime, then shouldn't you just boycott them all anyway sub or dub?

    I've been boycotting all Japanese Godzilla movies because they are pretty much Japanese propaganda (Shin Godzilla was super obvious about it)



  • @MordethKai I'm not sure where you got your information, but your idea of the definition of localization is far off the mark. I've got a reasonable work history in language, so I'll first point you to the industry association site for a legitimate definition. GALA

    In the professional languages industry, you'll find three basic job types: Interpretation, Translation, and Localization. Although they are similar, there are also some pretty drastic differences. All three would be expected to make the distinction of the difference of balls mentioned. On to the differences.

    Interpretation is normally done for spoken language. Someone working as an interpreter will generally be listening to a conversation and attempting to give an exact explanation of what is being said. This is definitely the most difficult of the three types, and professionally is usually recorded for legal liability reasons. An inaccurate interpretation during any official event can carry jail time and cash fines if it can be shown as intentional. Even assuming that a part of a definition is implied can be assumed as criminal intent. An easily recognizable example would be the United Nations interpreters, but is actually a lot more common in international business.

    Translation generally implies written works. It can include things like scripts and books, but is normally only used for professional texts, scientific journals, contracts, or legal proceedings which require exact accuracy. As with an interpreter, there can be legal liability because of the nature of the business and risk of loss due to negligence.

    For reference to compare against the GALA site listed above, I'll provide the link to the American Translators Association. This is the industry certification for Interpretation and Translation. The certification is a requirement if expecting to work professionally within either field, and is taken as a supplement to some sort of professional credentials. For example, a lawyer would become certified as a translator for legal documents.

    Localization is by far the most forgiving term, but equally as difficult in its own way. Localization is generally only used for pop culture (magazines, books, television/movies) or hospitality industry such as tour guides, travel agents, or some hotels which specialize in foreign guests. The goal is not only language, but to put things into terms which will be easily understood by the target culture. The reason can be anything from religion to nationality, but is specific in that it requires an understanding of both the sending and receiving culture and any associated language differences which may be misunderstood.

    One of the best examples I can think of off the top of my head for Japanese is stoplights. The colors used for traffic stoplights are still the same in Japan. However, when referring to the green light, a Japanese will refer to it as blue. This is actually a cultural thing. Historically, the word for green didn't exist until after traffic lights were introduced. The color was still there, but was implied by the rest of the language. As a result, when they suddenly needed to refer to a green light, blue was the closest word they had. In the late 40's it was officially made to be a part of their language that the light indicating go on a stoplight is blue (even though everyone knows it's actually green).

    If interpreting or translating this, I would have to explain that they're saying blue, but then give the reason to cover myself from legal liability due to any misunderstanding. If localizing from Japanese to English, I simply change the word because it is what the English speaking cultures would understand.

    The same thing happens with anime (both sub and dub) all the time. Word for word translation is not always possible, and it's actually the case 90 percent of the time. The meaning can usually be implied, but not always.

    For an example of this, I'll use an English word which was taken up by the Japanese, but no longer has the same meaning in English. Therefore, translation is WAY off. As part of my weekly anime group, I managed to convince the others to watch "My Girlfriend is a Shobitch". Because it's sub only, it was like pulling teeth, but I managed to get them to watch. The title translation itself is bad. It should actually , even if keeping the shobitch word (which is actually Japanese because of this context, but more on that in a minute), should be "My Girlfriend is a Virgin Bitch". As for shobitch, this is a compound word. Sho implies first or new. Bitch was actually taken from the English language during the post World War 2 restructuring of Japan. During that time, in the English language bitch was a derogatory term for a female highly driven by sexual pursuits. Think of the phrase "bitch in heat" for the original meaning. The Japanese learned it in that regard, and the meaning remained the same. However, the meaning in English evolved to the point that you see pop culture references like "the bitch is back" or "Ms. Bitch" implying a strong independent female. Most Japanese are unaware of the change in meaning, and most Americans are unaware of the originally used meaning. This is the reason that the title tends to not make sense to English speakers, and why the Japanese translation of the title keeps the word bitch (they think they're using an English word which should be easily understood without the need for this explanation.)

    Another example of a poorly translated title, which actually had me a bit confused this Spring when still living in Tokyo, is Uchoten Kazoku. The English title for this show is something like Eccentric Family. I'm still not sure where they got the word eccentric for this title. Uchoten is a word to describe a level of extreme sudden happiness. This is like a level of happy that you have to break out into random song and dance. The only thing I have been able to assume is that someone trying to translate the title (again translated by Japanese) got the words eccentric and ecstatic confused just long enough to make it the official title. This is only assumption, but makes a lot more sense with regard to the translation.

    Things like this are why I'm constantly telling people to choose the medium that works for their wants. Both sub and dub are equally flawed. Sub is only slightly better with regard to accuracy because there is less of a time restriction to match to a scene or mouth flaps. The words used are equally flawed in most cases. Learning Japanese strictly for the sake of anime is equally ridiculous because of the amount of time invested. I have professional certifications, and almost six years of study, and am STILL learning. Hardly a week goes by that I don't hear a new word or slight twist to grammatical structure that I have to look up, not to mention that my studies were all done using Tokyo dialect. When an anime uses Osaka dialect, the backwoods farmer usually portrayed in American localizations with a southern accent, I can literally feel my head start to throb. The words are still the same, with only a few exceptions, but conjugation changes just enough to force me to have to think about every word. (Edit: I just realized that non-speakers may find this a bit confusing. All words in Japanese (whether noun, adjective, verb, or anything else) have specific conjugations which tie them to other words in the sentence. A lot of them are used to imply words which aren't spoken. For example, I can say either "hayatte ni narimasu" or conjugate to "hayaku" and still mean "become fast" or "hurry". This is a Tokyo dialect conjugation, but I'm just not familiar enough with the other dialects to think of one off the top of my head.)

    I've finished putting my two cents on this topic. I've yet to hear anything which I would consider to be political in nature, and haven't seen anything which would be so far off base to not be considered changing lines to make them culturally relevant or match timing/mouth flaps for a scene. I've provided professional references for language industry standards as well as basic translations for simple reference. In addition, neither of the anime mentioned regarding translation issues are Funimation titles. While this only scratches the surface, it should be more than enough information to satisfy anyone that isn't simply looking for something to complain about.



  • The thing about boycotts - they only have an impact if they're joined in large enough numbers for a business to experience a significant financial loss. You, and a handful of other people are like drops in the ocean, especially when it comes to subscription fees.

    I don't think the vocal crowds that buy into this outrage are fans of Funimation's work anyway, or dubs in general for that matter. Given that, you may have particular preferences, but no individual has the financial weight to direct how a company works. Funimation is going to keep doing what they think will make their base audience happy.



  • When doing dubs, Funimation should stick as close to the actual translation as possible, without changing the script and Americanizing the anime. The dub script should be almost identical to the English subs, and retain the culture.



  • @Spaceshotx7 you want them to call green traffic lights blue, keep senpai/chan/kun/etc or other things that really don't translate like "itadakimasu"? Or how how calling not differentiating between panties and pants since both are just "pantsu"?



  • @Doublethree100 said in Why I boycott funimation:

    @Spaceshotx7 you want them to call green traffic lights blue, keep senpai/chan/kun/etc or other things that really don't translate like "itadakimasu"? Or how how calling not differentiating between panties and pants since both are just "pantsu"?

    Honestly, I do kind of like keeping Senpai. There isn't really a good analog to that in English...other than saying "my senior" which sounds stupid.

    I think the OP actually ranted about Ms. Kobayashi's Dragon Maid...saying calling her 'Ms.' was politically correct. That's kind of a ridiculous argument. 'Kobayashi-san" translates well to Ms. Kobayashi



  • People would just complain about not understanding the cultural references if scripts were exactly the same as the Japanese. If the English dub called a green stop light Blue, there would be hoards of confused people. No one can really win.

    There is no one size fits all when it comes to translations and dubs. Some shows are better with honorifics left intact (I find school based anime to be better when they are left), and others are more appropriate changed. Some things should not be changed from the Japanese term. (like Shiba inu translated as Shiba dog). I prefer consistency in an anime, but making it work for that anime.



  • Honestly, I do kind of like keeping Senpai. There isn't really a good analog to that in English...other than saying "my senior" which sounds stupid.

    I personally don't like titling someone. Saying something like Kakashi-Sensei just... sounds odd. Kakashi Teacher? Even senior/senpai in common English use is wierd. Fourth year high school students are seniors, but you wouldn't really say that someone is your senior.

    Though if you are in a unique position where just your title can be used to identify you, I would also use that depending on context. Like "My manager is a pretty lessaiz-faire." and "Jane is a pretty easy person to talk to."

    Though I'm not a paragon of being proper, you'll never hear me utter the words "mister" or "misses" unironically. I'd probably be a terrible Japanese person where I'd never suffix someone.



  • @darthrutsula40 said in Why I boycott funimation:

    Honestly, I do kind of like keeping Senpai. There isn't really a good analog to that in English...other than saying "my senior" which sounds stupid.

    I personally don't like titling someone. Saying something like Kakashi-Sensei just... sounds odd. Kakashi Teacher? Even senior/senpai in common English use is wierd. Fourth year high school students are seniors, but you wouldn't really say that someone is your senior.

    Though if you are in a unique position where just your title can be used to identify you, I would also use that depending on context. Like "My manager is a pretty lessaiz-faire." and "Jane is a pretty easy person to talk to."

    Though I'm not a paragon of being proper, you'll never hear me utter the words "mister" or "misses" unironically. I'd probably be a terrible Japanese person where I'd never suffix someone.

    the thing is, while we try to adapt the script for Westerners to understand, the plots are still based on Japanese culture, where being even a year older demands respect. So sometimes there is a need to explain to the audience why a student shows deference to a slightly older student.



  • I actually like the use of honorifics in anime, and it comes a lot easier to adapt to in Japanese language than you would think. I rarely use them in English, but it really feels natural when speaking Japanese. Some honorifics really don't apply well to translation though. For example, sensei (although often used when talking to a teacher) doesn't actually translate as teacher... it's actually a step higher than senpai. Another, although rarely used in the second person even in Japanese, is okyakusan which basically means honored guest.

    Some things will never translate clearly, and others just sound really odd. Language in itself is an adaptation of culture, and the Japanese culture places a lot of weight on ranking systems which are dependent upon the current environment. If going out for drinks after work, most honorifics go out the window when you leave the office. Likewise, when leaving school for the day, conversations become a lot more casual. I had never really thought about it till now, but it really is odd that so many anime use futsutai (casual speech) when talking to a boss, teacher, or rival/enemy. In those situations, it would be more natural to use teineitai (formal speech) to imply the difference in stature or unfamiliarity between the people talking.



  • @GoldCrusader said in Why I boycott funimation:

    I just think at this point you are making a mountain out of nothing honestly. Prison school went too far and they apologized. Nothing else they changed actually felt impactful. I'm going to be honest and say i never notices these controversial changes when I watch FUNi's dub and only actually see them when people bring them up.But hey if these 2 or 3 changes in 1 or 2 anime makes you feel cheated you have every right to not give FUNi any money. I personally think FUNimation produced some od their best dubs recently, so I sure as hell won't boycott.

    Also do remember, if you try to convince people about something like this, this isn't the right place. People here won't agree with you. I sure won't with some of the absolutely disgusting and awful things you said. Go try a place with people watching sub stuff, I'm sure you'll get a little traction.

    'disgustingly awful', heaven forbid anyone point out the growing trend of sex pests parading as feminists to avoid suspicion.

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  • @darthrutsula40 said in Why I boycott funimation:

    Honestly, I do kind of like keeping Senpai. There isn't really a good analog to that in English...other than saying "my senior" which sounds stupid.

    I personally don't like titling someone. Saying something like Kakashi-Sensei just... sounds odd. Kakashi Teacher? Even senior/senpai in common English use is wierd. Fourth year high school students are seniors, but you wouldn't really say that someone is your senior.

    Though if you are in a unique position where just your title can be used to identify you, I would also use that depending on context. Like "My manager is a pretty lessaiz-faire." and "Jane is a pretty easy person to talk to."

    Though I'm not a paragon of being proper, you'll never hear me utter the words "mister" or "misses" unironically. I'd probably be a terrible Japanese person where I'd never suffix someone.

    I don't think there is a universal answer for honorifics, which is why I tried to highlight 'relevant'. Biggest problem I have is with chan being changed to little. Teenagers calling eachother mr. and ms. just doesn't work, and an adult using that on a child tends to suggest the child is being scolded. If a show can be done without honorifics entirely without losing meaning, I'm ok with it, although I think it's best to leave them in period pieces for the sake of atmosphere.

    I honestly think people need to look at other foreign works, particularly in theater, to really get a grasp of the situation. Localization of anime and videogames is extremely overzealous.

    A lot of these things are judgement calls, and no one will be right all the time. Some things won't have a true right or wrong with plenty of justification either way, I can accept that. A lot of things are debatable, and debate is good. What pisses me off is when it seems like they weren't trying to be faithful to the original, injecting politics or memes etc.

    Full disclosure, I don't like modern feminists, I don't like them for the same reasons I didn't like the christian moral elite of the 90's. It's the smug self-righteous hypocrites of either group trying to govern morality and sanitize everything for our own good, and often turn out to be the very things they condemn (christian pastor commiting adultry, feminist sexual predators or covering for predators with liberal politics). I don't care what group does it or what standard they use, I oppose it either way. I hated when gay robots were cut from zoids, when guns were cut from pokemon, when blood and gore gets removed or censored, or when they changed a line about motoko being on her period in Ghost in the Shell to avoid offending people. The problem isn't the metric used to do that BS, it's the BS itself, same shit, different asshole.

    Whether christians preaching about morality and violence, or feminists preaching about sexism, or the next smug moral elite to demand conformity to their ideology in the future, I will oppose it. Christians thought they were doing the world a favor by removing all references to homosexuality, and feminists think they are doing the world a favor by removing everything they deem sexist, both groups think they have all the answers and know what's best for everyone, and both are tyrannical about imposing their view. So yeah, things of that nature are going to grab my attention.

    Since taking a step back and sorting my collection by dubbing studio, I have noticed another pattern that I have a problem with. That’s the 'joke dub' mentality which is now common with modern funimation. It's the 'Ghost Stories' effect, where the original script is disregarded to varying degrees to inject humor. It gets defended because everyone likes jokes, even when they fall flat, but it parallels censorship in disturbing ways. It's not being done to sanitize, but it is taking a massive dump on the original. It often gets defended on the grounds of the original show being trash, which is a smug condescending hypocritical mentality that can be applied to the entire medium, nothing is sacred. Just as different views of morality can be used to justify censorship, this attitude gets used to justify destroying works for humor.

    Maybe the 'memes' group is the next emerging elite, vandalizing art in the name of humor instead of a moral code. It sounds crazy but you never know. I was a christian when I opposed the christian moral elite, I was a feminist before I decided they had gone too far and opposed them, and my liking memes won't stop me from opposing the humor crowd. Parodies are fine as long as they are separate from the original instead of replacing the original, I have no problem with abridged youtube series, and if joke dubs were done separate from legit dubs I'd support that, as long as there is a legit dub for the people who care. It's probably more realistic to include outtakes and studio BS than to make two versions, and stuff like that used to be an additional selling point for owning an expensive physical copy. The things happening to the shows you don't care about can be done to the shows you do care about, mutual respect is important.

    I've had christians shame me for enjoying the things I like (D&D, music, fantasy books), I have feminists shaming me for things I like (ecchi, bikini armor, large boobs on a slender hourglass figure), now a jokes crowd wants to make fun of me for wanting to protect and enjoy something they deemed lame. I just want to enjoy my hobbies in peace without a bunch of elitist biggots taking over and corrupting the things I enjoy. As far as I can tell, biggots in at least two of those groups are running the show at funimation.



  • Once again, i can understand where you are coming from i.e., you don’t want creative liberties taken with the properties, yet, at the same time, i guess i’m not going to go “krakatoa” if say, FUN throws a “political line” here or there. I’m still grateful that FUNimation provides us with the service they do, without which, i would imagine that my life would be even more boring (laughs) ;-) Moreover, i guess my mind is thinking on daunting issues such like, “How much more will my health insurance premiums be going up this coming year?” Question. Did you take down your post discussing Vic Mignogna OR was it removed by FUNimation Staff?

    Nobu- Looks like while i was away, you got access back to your old account?

    Pleco Breeder- Do you happen to offer Japanese lessons, if so, how much would that cost me per lesson? Are you based in the US? If that last one is too personal, DO NOT answer it. Thanks in advance.

    Overall, with some of these long posts on this thread, God bless, i believe the spirit of Grand Alliance is alive and well.

    Hoping that everyone here had a decent Thanksgiving,

    Sincerely,
    P.J.

    P.S.- Sorry to hear about your shaming experience. That really is ridiculous especially in this age of campaigns to end bullying. Not for nothing though, if they treated you in that manner, they were just "Christian" in name only.



  • ._.
    I really tried to read everything, but I think I got overwhelmed somewhere in there.
    Anyway, a lot of what you said seems like nitpicking BS. But not all of it.
    Politics IMO, are VERY unwelcome. I only just found out about the dubbing fiasco with Maid Dragon. That was pretty much an offense.
    If people are shaming you on what you like, and it isn't something illegal, then the shame is on them.
    Finally, to contrast something you said earlier about some dubs leaving things out, particularly regarding Pokemon, as I'm overly familiar with that, the removal of guns and other stuff might be questionable now, but not as much then. Back then, it was a sort of entry point. Make the series accessible, or it fails. Thankfully, anime localization has gotten far less strict, afaik. But back then, it was pretty much needed.
    I guess a sort of added comment would be something like, it'd be nice if we get what we missed back then on account of changing times, but I doubt that would happen.
    My apologies if I skipped over anything significant, or really screwed up somehow.


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