I wonder why idol anime is not a popular anime genre in the US?



  • I am wondering why idol anime doesn't seem to be as big a hit in the United States? I mean Love Live has gotten popular in the United States and multiple countries in the world. However not much idol anime has been licensed, and only a new have been dubbed. why is that?

    I would like to see Funimation license and dub more Idol anime, and Catlin Glass would be the best person to direct the dubs, since she seems to care a lot about music based anime.

    I also wonder why Symphogear is never going to be licensed and released in the US like Love Live has?



  • Personally, I've never really enjoyed them very much so I can see why they wouldn't be overly popular. I haven't watched any of the Love Live series yet (I do plan to, just to see what all the hullabaloo is about) but the ones I have seen have just been decent, not great.

    Not to mention, as we know, songs are expensive to license and therefor would likely make the shows cost more to bring over. Also, a lot of these shows are made to at least partially promote the Japanese idol groups that voice these characters, so I imagine that plays a part too. What is the point of dubbing over that when the advertisement for those groups is a big reason why the show is even made?

    I've watch Kirarin Revolution, Full Moon wo Sagashite, UtaPri, bits of Show by Rock, The IdolM@ster and Macross Frontier and really, Full Moon is the only one I have really liked. It strikes me as more of an advertisement rather then a real attempt to make a show that can stand on its own with a strong plot.

    But that's just my opinion. They don't strike me as shows that appeal to a very wide audience and thus, are a bit of a risk.



  • You may as well be asking why the Phantasy Star Online 2 anime never got popular overseas. What's the point of an idol anime if nobody knows about the idol group or their songs?



  • It's all about the Benjamins.



  • I know in the last 2 years, Funimation has been picking up and dubbing more Slice Of Life anime, eventhough that genre wasn't that popular in the past. Is the Slice Of Life anime genre picking up here in the United States?

    For Broadcast dubs, you now see all different types of genres.



  • Keep in mind dubbing songs in an idol anime is basically if a sushi restaurant owner in the US took a Japanese sushi restaurant's commercial (with permission) and dubbed over it to make it advertising his restaurant instead. The Japanese restaurant probably wouldn't let him and it's probably the same thing for singing in idol anime.



  • Two things. First of all, in the above post, I was talking about Slice Of Life anime, and the fact that Funimation has been acquiring and dubbing more Slice Of Life anime than in the past. I thought that genre wasn't that popular, and I was wondering if Slice Of Life anime is getting more popular because more of them are being licensed and dubbed by both Funimation and occasionally Sentai Filmworks?

    Second of all, in an idol anime, are you saying that The Japanese producers don't want anyone except the seiyu doing anykind of singing, no matter how brief and minor, as such so that the US Voice Actors are prohibited from singing in Idol Anime? What is the difference who is singing the song?



  • @Spaceshotx7 said in I wonder why idol anime is not a popular anime genre in the US?:

    Two things. First of all, in the above post, I was talking about Slice Of Life anime,

    I was responding to your original post not the above post. I'd say slice of life has always been getting dubs. Off the top of my head there's stuff like Haruhi, K-On, Azumanga Dioh, Clannad, etc which are all over 10 years old (original airing and I'm pretty sure none of those were left too long before getting dubbed)

    @Spaceshotx7 said in I wonder why idol anime is not a popular anime genre in the US?:

    What is the difference who is singing the song?

    Because the anime is created to advertise the singers. In my above example about the sushi restaurants the Japanese restaurant created an ad for his business. He spent money on it, probably helped make sure the ad accurately captured what he wanted and maybe made a specific product just for this ad. The American wants to come in, spend maybe half the amount of money, dub over it and completely remove any reference to the Japanese sushi restaurant.

    Replace "Japanese restaurant" with Lantis, "American restaurant" with Funimation (or whoever is dubbing) "sushi" with the idol group and "product" with "song(s)". Now do you see why?

    Making an anime costs a lot more than dubbing it. Lantis put a lot of money into advertising their idol group "Aqours" and removing the songs they are trying to sell from a version of the ad defeats the purpose of the ad. Even if Funimation started an English Aqours that performs and dubs every single Aqours song (believe me, there's A LOT of Love Live music that has nothing to do with the anime) they are still taking Lantis' ad, altering it slightly and changing it to be an ad for their own product instead of Lantis' original product.



  • This all looks familiar.



  • @Spaceshotx7 said in I wonder why idol anime is not a popular anime genre in the US?:

    Two things. First of all, in the above post, I was talking about Slice Of Life anime, and the fact that Funimation has been acquiring and dubbing more Slice Of Life anime than in the past. I thought that genre wasn't that popular, and I was wondering if Slice Of Life anime is getting more popular because more of them are being licensed and dubbed by both Funimation and occasionally Sentai Filmworks?

    They've been licensing more of literally every genre compared to previous years because they've been licensing way more shows in general. They licensed four shows for simulcast total in Summer 2013, four years ago (High School DxD New, Danganronpa, Brothers Conflict, and Hyperdimension Neptunia). It doesn't do you any good to single out any one genre


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