Dagashi Kashi Season 2 Snack Buying Guide



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    As many of you have probably heard, Dagashi Kashi is returning for a season 2! That's right, Hotaru is back with all her friends in a brand new season full of hijinks, and most importantly, more wild dagashi candy for you to enjoy! A lot of you may remember that during the simuldub of the first season, I posted weekly snack buying guides, each examining the snacks that were featured in that night's episode. The guide got longer and longer each week as I found more and more to research. I had a blast writing the first guide, and I cannot wait to bring you guys more snacks and where to buy them, as we dive yet again into the twisted, crazy world that is Dagashi Kashi. I hope you will all join me again in 2018 when season 2 drops, as we explore more about crazy snack girls and cheap Japanese candies from the 50's. Season 1 was super fun, so season 2 should be great too! Hotaru, Kokonotsu (Coconuts), Saya, and To Endo are all back for more adventures, and are even joined by an all new character! Plus, a new studio and a new staff are added to mix things up! Check out the awesome trailer below! As Hotaru said in Season 1, "Are you crazy?! There's no way I could quit cold turkey! Dagashi is the reason for my existence. I need it like I need air, do you want me to suffocate?!" Of course she's back, she just couldn't stay away from that sweet dagashi! I look forward to seeing you guys back for season 2 of Dagashi Kashi!

    Season 2 Trailer:
    Youtube

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    I was so excited when I heard the news that season 2 was coming out in the near future, Dagashi Kashi was seriously one of my favorite shows in recent years, especially in the slice of life genre. I really enjoyed all of the characters, and the voice actors were just perfect. It is going to be very interesting to see where season 2 goes, and how things will play out after the season 1 finale. Many questions are yet to be answered (sort of), and there are tons more dagashi to talk about, so get ready season 2! For those who need to catch up on the past guide, I have posted a link to a word doc. with the archived version of the season 1 guide. Unfortunately, it removed all of the pictures, but the links are all still on there, so I apologize for the inconvenience.
    Google Drive download

    To get ready for the new episodes, I wanted to share with you all some pictures I took while on a recent trip to Japan. It was my first time out of the country, and I could not miss the opportunity to go to the place where dagashi candy got its very first start. Way back in the 1950's, a candy craze swept Japan, and it all started in a small city a few hours outside of Tokyo, called Kawagoe.

    Dagashi candy shops started becoming extremely popular in Japan in the 50's, and during its heyday, there were more than 70 dagashi shops on one street alone. That street came to be known as Kashiya Yokochō, or Penny Candy Alley. Today, there are about 20 dagashi shops that are still in operation on Penny Candy Alley, most of which have been operating since the early 50's. It was an incredible experience that I am just so excited to share with you all. I hope you enjoy these pictures and words below, and I will return in 2018 for season 2 of Dagashi Kashi! Have a nice week everyone!

    Hotaru Shidare with new character, Hajime Owari.
    Hotaru Shidare with new character, Hajime Owari.

    Hotaru Shidare
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    Kokonotsu Shikada
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    Saya Endo
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    To endo
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    Hajime Owari
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    Here is a list of the new staff:
    Director: Satoshi Kuwabara (Black Jack, Yu-Gi-Oh! Zexal)
    Series Composition: Mayumi Morita
    Character Designer: Nana Miura (Young Black Jack)
    Chief Animation Director: Akemi Kobayashi
    Music: Tomohata Ohsumi, Nobuaki Nobusawa
    Music Production: Pony Canyon
    Animation Production: Tezuka Productions
    Setting Cooperation: feel.

    Penny Candy Alley
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    My trip from Tokyo to Kawagoe took about 2 hours, travelling first by bus, then subway train, and then two more buses. After the long journey, I arrived at Penny Candy Alley early in the morning, just as the sun began to rise, and the first candy shops started opening their doors for the day's business. Needless to say, I was the only tourist in sight. As I got ready to enter into place that put dagashi candy on the spot, I thought back on the show Dagashi Kashi, and how awesome it would be to finally try some of the snacks from the TV show. It was going to be great! I entered into the alley just as some of the locals began to show up in the morning.

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    It was quite a sight to behold, seeing all of the different shops stretch down the alley and around the corner. There were shops of all different kinds! Some were very traditional, having the classic dagashi candies that were shown in season 1 of Dagashi Kashi. Imagine the Shikada Dagashi Shop, it's that style. It was really cool to see some of the same dagashi, as well as some I hadn't seen before.

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    Candy is the primary item sold on Penny Candy Alley, however, there are a variety of sweet treats that you might not expect. "Among the treats sold are various candies, rice crackers, karinto (sugar coated, deep fried cookies), ice cream, and cakes made of red bean paste and sweet potatoes. Also available are small toys and accessories which make nice souvenirs to take home."

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    As the morning got into full swing, swarms of small school children on field trips began to arrive at the Penny Candy Alley, in waves, all eager to buy as much candy, cakes and sweets as their pocket change will allow. I was surprised, to say the least, as I towered over the kids. It was so funny to see all these Japanese school children in their uniforms, and I'm the only tourist around. I can only imagine what they thought. Lol Soon, the shops were filled with kids buying and eating snacks right there in the alley, talking chatting, and having fun. Some got ice cream, and others got a popular street food called Takoyaki, that is considered a fun junk food. The main attraction, of course, was the dagashi candy!

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    I was having a great time, just browsing from shop to shop, but it was time I got into some shopping myself. I may have gone a little overboard, as I left with bags full of candy, treats, cakes, and more. Lol There was just so much to choose from, it was hard to say no, especially when it was something I had seen from Dagashi Kashi. The locals seemed very happy to be working at their shops, and many were older couples. There was even a small Ramen shop, just in case people wanted some lunch. There was an ice cream shop with sweet-potato fry "dippers," and a crispy baked goods place. It was a really fun area to hang out in!

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    It was like stepping back in time, with traditional buildings, clothing, toys and snacks from another era. It was an incredible experience. Dagashi has such a unique history, that makes it very special as a nostalgia item in modern day Japan. "While the modern dagashi was developed after World War 2, dagashi has been around since the Edo period (1603-1868), though the region of origin is unknown." After WWII, Kawagoe became the central spot for all of Japan's dagashi activity. Penny Candy Alley became very popular, as more shops opened. 'Dagashi', made from starch or corn, was the commoner equivalent of the more expensive 'jōgashi', which was higher quality and made from white sugar." Today, there are hundreds of different kinds of dagashi.

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    As I was wrapping up my dagashi filled journey, I found a last few shops near the end of Penny Candy Alley that were just packed to the brim with snacks of all kinds, many of which I recognized from Dagashi Kashi. It was so cool, because the candy was so cheap, you can just buy a ton of it, filling your bags as much as you can carry. By the end, I had 4 full bags of candy. This last store was the icing on the cake, and was just so cool to see.

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    It was an awesome time, and I am really glad I was able to document this trip and bring it to all you Dagashi Kashi fans. To see what it's like at Penny Candy Alley, and to connect more with the show and the dagashi candy! I hope you have enjoyed reading about Penny Candy Alley. If you are interested in learning more about the history of dagashi and Penny Candy Alley, check out this half-hour documentary by NHK, "Old Fashioned Sweet Shops." It is a great watch! As we get closer to the release of season 2, I will be posting snack reviews of some of the stuff I got while in Japan, so look out for those as well. Thanks for reading, have a fun, snack-filled day!! See you in season 2!!

    Begin Japanology Dagashi Ya: Good Old fashioned Sweetshops (NHK Documentary) on Youtube

    "Dagashi is truly a gift from heaven above... thank you for giving us this bliss.
    -Hotaru Shidare
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    Source link - Japan-Guide.com



  • Good read, and the first time I've seen the name of the new character. The name Hajime Owari, in case anybody doesn't know (or even cares to know), is a natural contradiction. Hajime translates as begin, and Owari is finish.

    I'm surprised to know that takoyaki (the infamous octopus balls) are being sold here though. I bought them daily as my evening snack in Tokyo for two reasons. Easy to eat while doing paperwork or finishing reports, and the fact that I'm pretty sure that the original translation of takoyaki was something along the lines of ambrosia. They're HIGHLY addictive. I still would have expected something more along the lines of taiyaki in a junkfood district though.

    Looking forward to the new guide and reviews.



  • Good to see you back nubguy! Definitely looking forward to Season 2 solely just to see you put the research into finding all the food!

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  • @pleco_breeder
    Thanks! I really appreciate that!
    Hajime's name is quite funny now that I know the translation! Lol I can't wait to see what kind of character she is, based on a name like that. Could she be even more crazy than Hotaru?
    That's cool! Sounds like its a good meal. How did you like your time in Japan? Yeah, it was pretty awesome! There was one shop that had that, and several other cooked items. Although, now that you mention it, I think I did see taiyaki there as well, but I didn't try any. I was kind of nervous to try that filling lol is it good?
    That's great to hear, I'm glad you're looking forward to it. I'll be sure to show you guys some awesome dagashi!

    @classyspartan
    Thanks classyspartan! It's good to be back! lol That's awesome of you to say man! I really appreciate that. I'm definitely ready to get back into some intense dagashi research! I can't wait to begin! This new season looks like its going to be good.



  • @nubguy said in Dagashi Kashi Season 2 Snack Buying Guide:

    @pleco_breeder
    Thanks! I really appreciate that!
    Hajime's name is quite funny now that I know the translation! Lol I can't wait to see what kind of character she is, based on a name like that. Could she be even more crazy than Hotaru?
    That's cool! Sounds like its a good meal. How did you like your time in Japan? Yeah, it was pretty awesome! There was one shop that had that, and several other cooked items. Although, now that you mention it, I think I did see taiyaki there as well, but I didn't try any. I was kind of nervous to try that filling lol is it good?
    That's great to hear, I'm glad you're looking forward to it. I'll be sure to show you guys some awesome dagashi!

    A lot of anime names are intentionally made similar to represent traits. At some point, if I ever get around to the time to make a list, I think a lot of people would be interested in knowing what their favorites actually mean as some are very funny and others very descriptive.

    I honestly didn't want to come back, but would have ran into problems with work if I hadn't. The only shop I tried the taiyaki from was a permanent shop halfway between my local supermarket and apartment. They served a couple different types of filling in theirs, but most vendors were strictly red bean paste (which tastes a lot like a strong flavored vanilla). Although it's rather good when you get used to it, the texture seems to be a bit difficult for most westerners to get used to. If you're not sensitive to the texture of foods, I'd definitely recommend it. To me, it seemed like a cross between a cookie and a jelly doughnut, but some of the others I knew from the US said the filling had too much of a thick, or rubbery, feel to be enjoyable. I'd also tried one which had some type of cocoa filling, but it was rather rich and bitter for my tastes. I'm sure you know by now, the Japanese do have some rather unusual flavors for their candies and snacks though.


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