Manga was cancelled because of poor recption of anime



  • Coming from here

    Supposedly the author said this

    I'm very sorry to write this but the timeline was not on my side. You see, the editor came to me last week and informed myself to increase the popularity of Keijo!!! This is not something you can do overnight. I was lost for words, as I believed we were doing fine in rankings. Today, I was informed by my editor that my manga is being removed due to the poor reception of the anime. The anime failed to make an impact, for advertising purposes, and the studio is carrying that loss because of it. It is my fault, and I am sorry. The source material should have been better and I've done a great burden. I was actually very surprised by the reception overseas. In various conversations, I was told it was greatly talked about in America. I'm glad some of you enjoyed it, but I'm sorry once again for failing. My sincerely apologies to Takahashi-san and XEBEC.

    Apparently the manga hasn't been doing well in Japan at all and the anime seems to have been a last ditch effort to boost popularity. I was wondering how it lasted so long but looking at Weekly Shonen Sunday's line-up they don't have a lot other than Magi, Conan and I guess Rinne since it keeps getting anime.

    Edit: quote seems to be fake. The manga is ending but it doesn't appear we have a reason.



  • I actually feel really bad for the poor writer, taking all that blame on themselves. Sometimes things hit, sometimes they miss, it's impossible to predict.



  • That pretty sad, I really liked the anime. I would definitely have watched the second season if there ever was one...

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  • Damn.

    I didn't love the show but the idea that the anime was poorly received, thus warranting manga cancellation is a pretty huge bummer no matter how you look at it.



  • Apparently that quote is fake. Next week is the last chapter but we don't know if the author chose to end it himself or if there was some other reason.



  • @Doublethree100 said in Manga was cancelled because of poor recption of anime:

    Apparently that quote is fake. Next week is the last chapter but we don't know if the author chose to end it himself or if there was some other reason.

    It sounded as though the manga was never a huge seller, and the anime didn't boost sales as much as the publisher had hoped.



  • This seems like a much more accurate report on Keijo's ending since it actually provides the blog post it is translating. It seems the editor told him to be ready to finish the manga by the time the anime ended so I guess it actually survived a few months longer than planned.

    Edit: Canipa (who goes around trying to disprove all fake anime related news) has had 3 translators check this and they all backed it up so it appears to be correct,



  • Kinda sad too, I won't say Keijo was the best anime but it was definitely... different. It was fun to watch and I'd imagine the manga was fun to read.



  • Keijo holds a special place for me because believe it or not, it was the catalyst that got me interested in anime again after a long hiatus. It caught my attention and made me a subscriber to this site, and acted as a gateway for getting into many new anime.

    I was very sad when I heard this news, as both the series and the manga always seemed to be the underdog in terms of sales and the likelihood of a continuation. Even the fan translations of the manga had bumps in the road going through 3 different sets of translators and long lulls where no updates were posted. I figured the series was always doomed to never see an English publication due to the nature of it's content, but this premature cancellation almost certainly seals the deal on that.

    Keijo is a manga that I truly love. Yes it is flawed, yes it can be immature, over the top, and completely ridiculous at times, but the artwork, the story, and the characters hold a special place for me. Were it available in English, I would preorder ever volume right away, so it particularly sucks to hear that low sales are the reason it is ending prematurely.



  • Ironic, because the anime series appears to have done quite well in the West. But o wait, our revenues don't even make a dent, so GGWP...



  • Yeah, besides whatever minor income they receive from streaming numbers, we literally had no opportunity to send any money their way through sales of products or manga. There just isn't anything available.



  • @MyOnlyFarph said in Manga was cancelled because of poor recption of anime:

    Yeah, besides whatever minor income they receive from streaming numbers, we literally had no opportunity to send any money their way through sales of products or manga. There just isn't anything available.

    I'm not sure how what percentage it is for Funimation, but 50% of the revenue that Crunchyroll receives is set back to the Japanese licensors, proportional to which shows were watched most. And Keijo was one of the more popular shows across the country near the beginning of the season, so that "minor" income adds up to a substantial factor in how profitable a show is overall.



  • @EyeOfPain

    Overseas incomes are still less then 20% of total revenue as of 2015 figures at approximately 35 billion yen (350 million USD at a 1-100 conversation rate), although this is number has growing exponentially in last few years. Before, it was around 10%, effectively doubling from '13 to '15. Anime market peaked in 2005, and 2015 was first year overseas revenue exceeded the previous record. However, today it does make up a more significant source of revenue.

    I would assume that 2016 and now 2017 numbers to be even higher, but we are still not at the stage whereas non-Japan overtakes Japan; and although as a whole it is increasing, it does not mean individual revenue for a particular show to an anime studio from US/West revenue is very high. It just means all the money is dumping into Naruto, SAO, Your Name, the like.

    I suggest this Japanese industry association report for more info.

    http://aja.gr.jp/english/japan-anime-data



  • I'm no expert on how the math adds up, but a Crunchy subscription is only $7 a month, Funi $6, and most people watch dozens of shows under those subscriptions. Being a big fan of this series, I probably only contributed pennies to the actual creators once it's all divided up. I'm sure those pennies add up when viewed in mass, but compared to manga sales, where one could potentially spend over $100, or blu-ray sales which could also be $50 or so, overseas fans could have contributed much more. But Since the manga will likely never receive an official English release and Funimation blu-rays won't be available for some time, there's really nothing we can do as fans to show support, besides maybe buying imported merchandise, but good luck with that ordeal. It's just frustrating to see something tank due to low sales, when you yourself have no opportunity to chip in.



  • @MyOnlyFarph said in Manga was cancelled because of poor recption of anime:

    I'm no expert on how the math adds up, but a Crunchy subscription is only $7 a month, Funi $6, and most people watch dozens of shows under those subscriptions. Being a big fan of this series, I probably only contributed pennies to the actual creators once it's all divided up. I'm sure those pennies add up when viewed in mass, but compared to manga sales, where one could potentially spend over $100, or blu-ray sales which could also be $50 or so, overseas fans could have contributed much more. But Since the manga will likely never receive an official English release and Funimation blu-rays won't be available for some time, there's really nothing we can do as fans to show support, besides maybe buying imported merchandise, but good luck with that ordeal. It's just frustrating to see something tank due to low sales, when you yourself have no opportunity to chip in.

    Like you said, it adds up. Most NA anime releases sell a couple thousand units if they're lucky, and a large percentage of that goes to retailers and distributors. CR recently reached 1 million paid subscribers, and has several times more free users.


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